If you are in discomfort, the medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Symptom: Any subjective evidence of disease. In contrast, a sign is objective. Blood from a nostril is a sign; it is apparent to the patient, physician, and others. Anxiety, low back pain, and fatigue are all symptoms; only the patient can perceive them.

Got body aches? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call the office in your location to make an appointment.

Body aches, pains, soreness, and tenderness can affect one, two, or many parts of the body. It also may feel like your entire body is painful or tender to the touch.

Body aches and pains can persistently affect one area only, can shift and affect another area or areas, and can migrate all over and affect many areas over and over again.


Why is my whole body aching?

Hyperstimulation can cause the body’s muscles to remain tight even though the immediate threat has passed. Headaches, muscle pain, muscle tension, tight muscles, body aches and pains, and stiffness are all common symptoms of stress-response hyperstimulation. This can also be a cause of persistent body aches and pains.

Why does my body ache and I feel tired all the time?

Chronic fatigue syndrome. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition that causes you to feel exhausted and weak, no matter how much rest or sleep you get. It often causes insomnia. Because your body doesn’t feel rested or replenished, CFS can also cause aches in the muscles and joints throughout your body.

What can cause unexplained muscle pain?

The most common causes of muscle pain are tension, stress, overuse and minor injuries. Systemic muscle pain or pain throughout your whole body is more often the result of an infection, an illness or a side effect of a medication. Common causes of muscle pain include: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome.


Got a runny nose? Sneezing? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is a runny nose?

A runny nose is excess drainage produced by nasal and adjacent tissues and blood vessels in the nose. This drainage may range from a clear fluid to thick mucus. Runny nose drainage may run out of your nose, down the back of your throat or both.

The terms “rhinorrhea” and “rhinitis” are often used to refer to a runny nose. Strictly speaking though, rhinorrhea refers to a thin, relatively clear nasal discharge. Rhinitis refers to inflammation of the nasal tissues from a number of causes, which usually results in a runny nose.

Nasal congestion may or may not accompany runny nose.

Why do I suddenly have a runny nose?

Runny nose can be caused by anything that irritates or inflames the nasal tissues. Infections such as the common cold and influenza. Allergies and various irritants may all cause a runny nose. Acute sinusitis or sinus infection can cause a runny nose.

How long does a runny nose last?

Usually there is no fever; in fact, fever and more severe symptoms may indicate that you have the flu rather than a cold. Cold symptoms typically last for about 3 days. At that point the worst is over, but you may feel congested for a week or more.

Why do I have runny nose every morning?

In most cases, when you have allergic rhinitis, you sneeze again and again, especially after you wake up in the morning. The drainage from a runny nose caused by allergies is usually clear and thin. But it may become thicker and cloudy or yellowish if you get a nasal or sinus infection.


Feeling under the weather? Think you may have the flu? The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is the flu?

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza is commonly called the flu, but it’s not the same as stomach “flu” viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

For most people, influenza resolves on its own. But sometimes, influenza and its complications can be deadly. People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

  • Young children under age 5, and especially those under 2 years
  • Adults older than age 65
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • Pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • People who have chronic illnesses such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease and diabetes
  • People who are very obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher

The annual influenza vaccine is your best defense against the flu.

What are the beginning signs of the flu?

Common signs and symptoms of the flu include:

– Fever over 100.4 F (38 C)
– Aching muscles, especially in your back, arms and legs
– Chills and sweats
– Headache
– Dry, persistent cough
– Fatigue and weakness
– Nasal congestion
Sore throat

How long does it take to get over the flu?

A bout of the flu typically lasts one to two weeks, with severe symptoms subsiding in two to three days. However, weakness, fatigue, dry cough, and a reduced ability to exercise can linger for three to seven days.

What is the difference between influenza A and B?

While the symptoms of influenza B mirrors those of A, the main difference between the two strains is who it can affect. This allows strains of A to be spread more rapidly than B, while also meaning strains of B cannot cause pandemics with symptoms likely less severe. Flu shots protect against both strains of influenza.

How contagious is the flu?

The Flu Is Contagious. Most healthy adults may be able to infect other people beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Children may pass the virus for longer than 7 days. Symptoms start 1 to 4 days after the virus enters the body.

Is it a cold or the flu?

The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose.


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