five-facts-you-should-know-about-arthritis

What To Understand About Arthritis and How To Deal With It

Arthritis affects the people of all ages. The common symptoms of arthritis include joint pain, swelling and stiffness that may vary over time. Arthritis makes life painful, causing trouble in physical activities and get worse with age leading to disabilities.

Regardless of age or sex arthritis can cripple anyone. Although, nearly 53 million adults and 300,000 children have fallen victim to arthritis in America, most people are little aware about this disease and the type of arthritis they suffer.

Osteoarthritis or degenerate arthritis:

It is one of the most common forms of arthritis affecting millions across the world. When the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears away, it rubs against one another and commonly causes pain in the joints of knees, hands, hips and spine. There is no any common cure for Osteoarthritis. You can control its effect only by:

  •  Maintaining a healthy weight
  •  Regular physical activity balancing rest
  •  Avoiding excessive and repetitive movements.
  •  Using other therapies and treatment.

Inflammatory arthritis:

When human immune systems mistakenly attack the joints and body tissues it is called rheumatoid or inflammatory arthritis. Besides attacking the joints it can affect other organs and parts of the body like eyes, skin, lungs and blood vessels. The symptoms get worse over time with the progress of the disease.

Infectious or septic Arthritis:

It is often caused by the infection of bacteria or viruses into your joints. Joints may become infected with germs or viruses travel through the bloodstream or directly through any injuries. Prompt treatment is necessary to clear the joint infection and prevent the spreading of infection.

Metabolic Arthritis:

The Human body produces uric acid and sometimes its amount increases more than the required. The extra amount of uric acid remains within the body because the body can’t discharge it quickly enough. It creates some needle like crystals in the joint, causing sudden episodic joint paint. It’s also called Gout attack. Controlling the uric acid level in your blood is the only way to get rid of Gout.

Is there any possible prevention?

Research is still underway to find a solution of Arthritis. Right now, it is a kind of disease where true prevention seems to be impossible. However, one can reduce the effect of arthritis and can slow down its progress by taking some caution.

  •  Maintain a healthy weight with regular physical activity.
  •  Eat healthy food, eat less, and do more aerobic exercise.
  •  Water exercises are best for arthritis sufferers.
  •  Quit smoking and drinking alcohol specially those who suffers Gout.
  •  Avoiding excessive and repetitive movements .
  •  Strengthening the muscles around the join for added support.
  •  Use some therapies and medication to help reduce pain and inflammation.
  •  Don’t delay to see a doctor if you have joint symptoms.

These are the things that can be done to preserve joint function and regain pleasure in life with no more pain. Arthritis is the no 1 reason causing disability among many people across the world. It might seem simple or its symptoms may not be severe for you during the initial period. But at any point of time it shouldn’t be ignored and it’s a good idea to visit your doctor as early as possible.

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases Medicine doctor hand working Professional doctor use computer and medical equipment all around, desktop top view

If you believe you have a sexually transmitted disease, (STD) it’s important to be tested and get proper treatment right away. The board certified physicians at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment today.

The STD Lab Panel contains the following tests:

    • Chlamydia Test
    • Gonorrhea Test
    • HIV-1 Antibodies Test
    • Syphilis Test
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type I
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type II
    • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
    • Hepatitis B Core Antibodies Total
    • Hepatitis C Antibody

Insured Patients – Some or all of included services may be covered by your insurance plan. Please check with your insurance provider before scheduling an appointment. As a courtesy, we will file a claim on your behalf to insurance companies we are in-network with.

Gonorrhea and Chlamydia

These STDs often co-exist in the same infected individual and can be passed simultaneously to a sexual partner. Since treatment for each of these conditions may differ, it’s an excellent medical practice to test for both if either one is suspected. Furthermore, these serious STDs may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, if they are not treated, they can cause pain and serious health problems, such as arthritis and infertility.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a serious bacterial infection. It’s usually passed from one person to another by sexual contact. If it’s not treated, syphilis can lead to permanent brain, nerve, and tissue damage.

Herpes (HSV)

Genital herpes is a common STD caused by a virus. The virus is called the herpes simplex virus or HSV. It causes painful blisters that break open and form sores in the genital area.

HIV-1 Infection and AIDS

HIV is the abbreviation used for the human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a life-threatening disease.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed and tender. It may also become swollen. Areas of liver tissue may be destroyed by the inflammation. Hepatitis B is a serious, sometimes severe and even fatal type of hepatitis. In addition to being a sexually transmitted disease (STD), Hepatitis B is a blood-borne pathogen and exposure to the blood of an infected person may result in infection.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed. Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. The virus is spread mainly through contact with infected blood. Sometimes it’s spread through sexual contact.

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Doctors Immediate Care offers low cost vaccinations. Please call your local office to make an appointment.

What vaccinations does Doctors Immediate Care provide?

Doctors Immediate Care can provide Hep B, HIB, DTaP, IPV, Prevnar, Rotatek, CBC and lead level, MMR, Varicella, Meningococcal , HPV #1, HPV #2, HPV #3, Gardasil, Zoster( Shingles).

Vaccines play an important role in keeping us healthy. They protect us from serious and sometimes deadly diseases. Please call our offices to schedule an appointment.

Read answers to common questions to learn more about vaccine safety, the recommended schedule, how vaccines protect your child from 14 diseases by age two, and more.

Q: Are vaccines safe?

A: Yes. Vaccines are very safe. The United States’ long-standing vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. Currently, the United States has the safest vaccine supply in its history. Millions of children safely receive vaccines each year. The most common side effects are typically very mild, such as pain or swelling at the injection site.

Q: What are the side effects of the vaccines? How do I treat them?

A: Vaccines, like any medication, may cause some side effects. Most of these side effects are very minor, like soreness where the shot was given, fussiness, or a low-grade fever. These side effects typically only last a couple of days and are treatable. For example, you can apply a cool, wet washcloth on the sore area to ease discomfort.

Serious reactions are very rare. However, if your child experiences any reactions that concern you, call the doctor’s office.

Q: What are the risks and benefits of vaccines?

A: Vaccines can prevent infectious diseases that once killed or harmed many infants, children, and adults. Without vaccines, your child is at risk for getting seriously ill and suffering pain, disability, and even death from diseases like measles and whooping cough. The main risks associated with getting vaccines are side effects, which are almost always mild (redness and swelling at the injection site) and go away within a few days. Serious side effects after vaccination, such as a severe allergic reaction, are very rare and doctors and clinic staff are trained to deal with them. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children. The only exceptions to this are cases in which a child has a serious chronic medical condition like cancer or a disease that weakens the immune system, or has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous vaccine dose.

Q: Is there a link between vaccines and autism?

A: No. Scientific studies and reviews continue to show no relationship between vaccines and autism.

Some people have suggested that thimerosal (a compound that contains mercury) in vaccines given to infants and young children might be a cause of autism. Others have suggested that the MMR (measles- mumps-rubella) vaccine may be linked to autism. However, numerous scientists and researchers have studied and continue to study the MMR vaccine and thimerosal, and reach the same conclusion: there is no link between MMR vaccine or thimerosal and autism.

Q: Why do vaccines start so early?

A: The recommended schedule protects infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they come into contact with life-threatening diseases. Children receive immunization early because they are susceptible to diseases at a young age. The consequences of these diseases can be very serious, even life-threatening, for infants and young children.

Q: Haven’t we gotten rid of most of these diseases in this country?

A: Some vaccine-preventable diseases, like pertussis (whooping cough) and chickenpox, remain common in the United States. On the other hand, other diseases vaccines prevent are no longer common in this country because of vaccines. However, if we stopped vaccinating, the few cases we have in the United States could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases. Even though many serious vaccine-preventable diseases are uncommon in the United States, some are common in other parts of the world. Even if your family does not travel internationally, you could come into contact with international travelers anywhere in your community. Children who don’t receive all vaccinations and are exposed to a disease can become seriously sick and spread it through a community.

Q: Why does my child need a chickenpox shot? Isn’t it a mild disease?

A: Your child needs a chickenpox vaccine because chickenpox can actually be a serious disease. In many cases, children experience a mild case of chickenpox, but other children may have blisters that become infected. Others may develop pneumonia. There is no way to tell in advance how severe your child’s symptoms will be.

Before vaccine was available, about 50 children died every year from chickenpox, and about 1 in 500 children who got chickenpox was hospitalized.

Q: My child is sick right now. Is it okay for her to still get shots?

A: Talk with your child’s doctor, but children can usually get vaccinated even if they have a mild illness like a cold, earache, mild fever, or diarrhea. If the doctor says it is okay, your child can still get vaccinated.

Q: What are the ingredients in vaccines and what do they do?

A: Vaccines contain ingredients that cause the body to develop immunity. Vaccines also contain very small amounts of other ingredients. All ingredients play necessary roles either in making the vaccine, or in ensuring that the final product is safe and effective.

Q: Don’t infants have natural immunity? Isn’t natural immunity better than the kind from vaccines?

A: Babies may get some temporary immunity (protection) from mom during the last few weeks of pregnancy, but only for diseases to which mom is immune. Breastfeeding may also protect your baby temporarily from minor infections, like colds. These antibodies do not last long, leaving your baby vulnerable to disease.

Natural immunity occurs when your child is exposed to a disease and becomes infected. It is true that natural immunity usually results in better immunity than vaccination, but the risks are much greater. A natural chickenpox infection may result in pneumonia, whereas the vaccine might only cause a sore arm for a couple of days.

Q: Can’t I just wait to vaccinate my baby, since he isn’t in child care, where he could be exposed to diseases?

A: No, even young children who are cared for at home can be exposed to vaccine preventable diseases, so it’s important for them to get all their vaccines at the recommended ages. Children can catch these illnesses from any number of people or places, including from parents, brothers or sisters, visitors to their home, on playgrounds or even at the grocery store. Regardless of whether or not your baby is cared for outside the home, she comes in contact with people throughout the day, some of whom may be sick but not know it yet.

If someone has a vaccine preventable disease, they may not have symptoms or the symptoms may be mild, and they can end up spreading disease to babies or young children.  Remember, many of these diseases can be especially dangerous to young children so it is safest to vaccinate your child at the recommended ages to protect her, whether or not she is in child care.

Q: Do I have to vaccinate my baby on schedule if I’m breastfeeding him?

A: Yes, even breastfed babies need to be protected with vaccines at the recommended ages. The immune system is not fully developed at birth, which puts newborns at greater risk for infections.

Breast milk provides important protection from some infections as your baby’s immune system is developing. For example, babies who are breastfed have a lower risk of ear infections, respiratory tract infections, and diarrhea. However, breast milk does not protect children against all diseases. Even in breastfed infants, vaccines are the most effective way to prevent many diseases. Your baby needs the long-term protection that can only come from making sure he receives all his vaccines according to the CDC’s recommended schedule.

Q: What’s wrong with delaying some of my baby’s vaccines if I’m planning to get them all eventually?

A: Young children have the highest risk of having a serious case of disease that could cause hospitalization or death. Delaying or spreading out vaccine doses leaves your child unprotected during the time when they need vaccine protection the most. For example, diseases such as Hib or pneumococcus almost always occur in the first 2 years of a baby’s life. And some diseases, like Hepatitis B and whooping cough (pertussis), are more serious when babies get them at a younger age. Vaccinating your child according to the CDC’s recommended immunization schedule means you can help protect him at a young age.

Drug testing is one action an employer can take to determine if employees or job applicants are using drugs. It can identify evidence of recent use of alcohol, prescription drugs and illicit drugs. The professional medical team at Doctors Immediate Care can preform these tests for you. Call our office to make an appointment.

Currently, drug testing does not test for impairment or whether a person’s behavior is, or was, impacted by drugs. Drug testing works best when implemented based on a clear, written policy that is shared with all employees, along with employee education about the dangers of alcohol and drug abuse, supervisor training on the signs and symptoms of alcohol and drug abuse, and an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to provide help for employees who may have an alcohol or drug problem.

Why do employers drug test?

Alcohol and drug abuse creates significant safety and health hazards and can result in decreased productivity and poor employee morale.  It also can lead to additional costs in the form of health care claims, especially short-term disability claims.

Employers implement drug testing to:

  • Deter employees from abusing alcohol and drugs
  • Prevent hiring individuals who use illegal drugs
  • Be able to identify early and appropriately refer employees who have drug and/or alcohol problems
  • Provide a safe workplace for employees
  • Protect the general public and instill consumer confidence that employees are working safely
  • Comply with State laws or Federal regulations
  • Benefit from Workers’ Compensation Premium Discount programs

How is drug testing conducted and how accurate is it?

Generally, most private employers have a fair amount of latitude in implementing drug testing for their organization, unless they are subject to certain Federal regulations, such as the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) drug-testing rules for employees in safety-sensitive positions.  However, Federal agencies conducting drug testing must follow standardized procedures established by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

While private employers are not required to follow these guidelines, doing so can help them stay on safe legal ground.  Court decisions have supported following these guidelines, and as a result, many employers choose to follow them.  These Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing (also called SAMHSA’s guidelines) include having a Medical Review Officer (MRO) evaluate tests.  They also identify the five substances tested for in Federal drug-testing programs and require the use of drug labs certified by SAMHSA.

The most common method of drug testing, urinalysis, can be done at the workplace (at a health unit, for example), a doctor’s office or any other site selected by the employer.  An employee or applicant provides a sample to be tested.  Usually precautions are taken, such as putting blue dye in the toilet and turning off the water supply, to prevent adulteration or substitution of specimens so that collection can be completed in privacy without any direct visual observation by another person.

Under SAMHSA’s guidelines, once a sample is provided, it is sent to a certified laboratory.  The accuracy of drug tests done by certified laboratories is very high, but this certification applies only to the five substances tested for in Federal drug-testing programs and alcohol.

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) takes place from Dec 7-13th every year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established the NIVW in 2005 to highlight the significance of an influenza vaccine. Getting a flu shot is the best way to prevent this influenza referred as the flu. It typically peaks from December to February and last as late as May and it’s the peak-time to get the flu shot.

Vaccination to keep away from the Flu

The Flu viruses are spreading and the people are getting sick. If you don’t want to be one among them, then get the flu shot now to enjoy the year-round with your friends and family without the “flu fear”. Vaccination is the best step to protect yourself and your loved ones against the flu. It is very important to get the flu vaccine every year.

Who needs the Flu shot?

According to the CDC, everyone, from 6 months to older will have to get the vaccination to protect themselves against the contagious flu. Some children from 6 months through 8 years will require two doses for complete protection. And the Children of this age group who are getting the shot for the first time should get two doses spaced at least 28 days apart. Your child’s Doctor can better tell you if your child requires two doses.

Types of Flu Vaccine

There are several options for this 2014-15 season:

The Trivalent flu vaccine protects against three different flu viruses, two influenza A viruses and influenza B virus.
The Quadrivalent flu vaccine protects against four different flu viruses, two influenza A viruses and influenza B virus.
Ask your Doctor to know which vaccine to get.

Where can I get the Vaccination?
If your doctor’s office is closed, you can find the nearest locations where the flu shots are available like local health department or pharmacy. You can use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to trace the nearest flu vaccine location by simply entering the zip code.

Check if you are at High Risk

The flu related complications can lead to one’s death. The People at high risk include:

• Pregnant women
• People with chronic conditions like diabetes, asthma, heart disease.
• Children under 5 years, and those of 65 years and older
• People living in nursing homes and such long-term care facility
• People around those who are at high risk like health care workers, household contacts
• And also caregivers

CDC has a complete list of the people who are at high risk of serious flu related complications, check hereand also check here if you should get vaccinated.

Get your flu shot today! Get it to live the year-round happily with your loved ones, without the “flu fear”.


Flu-Shots-special

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When you get sick and are in need of urgent care you only want the quickest service available in your area, whether its during the week or weekend, care becomes an urgency no matter what.

A trip to an immediate care clinic is just what the doctor ordered.

Immediate care facilities are more popular and becoming known for assisting those with an urgency by walking in and waiting. Most are equipped with state of the art equipment to diagnose and treat most minor injuries and sicknesses.

To Wait or Not to Wait

When a patient is feeling sick, they do not want to wait hours and hours to see a doctor at an emergency room, and immediate care clinic is your best choice by searching for an urgent care clinic near you, you can get the immediate care within minutes.

Most immediate care facilities are equipped to handle most minor sicknesses of life in and out in a hurry. Search Doctors Immediate care near you, they have facilities that are perfect for the times in life when stitches are required for a cut and any non life threatening emergency happens, when broken bones must be treated and you need a few stitches.

When minutes matter, and you need non emergency immediate care, seek help at an urgent care facility like Doctors Immediate Care because that is all you may have time for.

Find a Location Near You

With many locations in the greater Chicago area, you’ll find clinics in Lombard, Lisle and Lincolnwood areas for immediate assistance.

Immediate care facilities are equipped with state of the art equipment to diagnosis and treat the minor injuries and sicknesses that make life a problem. When a patient is feeling bad, they do not want to wait hours and hours to see a doctor at an emergency room.

Instead, most immediate care facilities are equipped to deliver the minor sicknesses of life in and out in a hurry. Immediate care facilities are also perfect for the times in life when stitches are required for a cut.

Immediate care facilities are also excellent for the times in life when broken bones must be treated.

Urgent care facilities, on the other hand, are important for the minor sicknesses and quick visits.

When minutes matter, and you need non emergency immediate care, seek help at an urgent care facility like Doctors Immediate Care because that is all you may have time for.

Types of Physical Exams

Your primary care provider (PCP) conducts regular tests to determine the status of your overall health. One can discuss changes or problems during those meetings with your PCP. In the following article, let’s look at various types of Physical exams.

Primary care health screening

Many students schedule a periodic physical exam to check on their health. Primary care health screenings are covered by the student health fee and has no charge.

Third-party-requested physical exam

This is a physical examination required by a third party, usually a potential employer or a study abroad program. This type of physical is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. If lab tests or immunizations are required to complete this physical, there is also a charge for those.

Peace Corps physical exam

This is a specific type of third-party physical with an extensive physical exam. It is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. There is also a charge for any immunizations required to complete the exam. Read the complete article here…

The next question which arises is what exactly happens during the Physical exam?

What are the areas of your body that the examiner inspects? In the following article, we look at it in detail.

The Physical Examination and Health Assessment

Many people who visit the doctor or health care provider’s office wonder: “What are they doing?”, “What are they looking for?” During a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider may be looking for as they are gathering cues and clues during the short time you are in the office. Some of the clues are based on the spoken information that you provide, or they may be based on physical examination findings.

During a health assessment, diagnosing an illness, disorder, or a condition is like a puzzle. Diagnosis often includes laboratory studies, radiology studies to look at certain organs, and the physical exam itself.  This process is called data collection. Before modern technology, it was important for health care providers to perfect their physical examination techniques, because x-ray machines, scanners, and echocardiograms were non-existent.

In a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider can find out by using their hands to feel (palpate), stethoscope and ears to listen, and eyes to see.  Findings that are present on the physical exam may by themselves diagnose, or be helpful to diagnose, many diseases. The components of a physical exam include:

Physical Examination and Inspection

Your examiner will look at, or “inspect” specific areas of your body for normal color, shape and consistency. Certain findings on “inspection” may alert your health care provider to focus other parts of the physical exam on certain areas of your body. For example, your legs may be swollen. Your health care provider will then pay special attention to the common things that cause leg swelling, such as extra fluid caused by your heart, and use this information to help them make a diagnosis.  Common areas that are inspected may include:

  • Your skin – to look for bruising, cuts, moles or lumps
  • Your face and eyes – to see if they are even and “normal”
  • Your neck veins – to see if these are bulging, distended (swollen)
  • Your chest and abdomen (stomach area) – to see if there are any masses, or bulges
  • Your legs – to see if there are any swelling
  • Your muscles – to check for good muscle tone
  • Your elbows and joints – check for swelling and inflammation, if any deformities are present. Click here to know more…
  • Once your physical examination is done then it’s time to wait for reports and an update from your doctor.

What You Need to Know About

The importance of immunizations and also the need for improving national immunization coverage levels and encourages all people to protect their health by being vaccinated against infectious diseases. importance-of-vaccines

Why Vaccinate?

  1. 1 child dies every 20 seconds from vaccine-preventable diseases.
  2. 1 in 5 child deaths are caused by pneumonia.
  3. Every year, 1.7 million children die from preventable diseases like rubella, mumps, tetanus, etc, because of no access to life-saving vaccines.
  4. 380,000 deaths per year caused by haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), which can cause meningitis and pneumonia.
  5. Vaccines boost the body’s own immune defense system by creating an immunity that protects the individual from infection.
  6. Vaccines contain a little bit of a disease germ that is weak or dead, introduced into the body to make antibodies to fight the source of the same kind that are responsible for the disease.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Immunizations are one of the top 10 public health accomplishments of the 20th century. Immunizations protect the people from Vaccine-preventable diseases, including hepatitis B, measles, Influenza, Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis, Pneumococcal, chickenpox, Human papillomavirus (HPV), etc.,. The main goal of NIAM is to increase awareness about immunizations. Immunizations continue to change and new vaccines are released each year, required for everyone irrespective of the age or occupation, needed throughout life in order to stay healthy. One need to assess the benefits and risks involved while considering immunization. It is advisable to consult the doctor.

Who Needs Vaccines?

Generally vaccines are recommended for infants, children, seniors, people with disabilities, pregnant woman, people suffering from health concerns, etc,.

Types of Vaccines

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type B. These diseases can kill or disable large numbers of children.
  • Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a virus that affects the liver.
  • Human Papillomavirus – HPV
  • Influenza
  • Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox)
  • Meningococcal disease
  • Pneumococcal disease

How to get Vaccine?

There are two types of vaccine:  1. Flu shot    2. Nasal Spray Flu shot is made with inactivated or killed flu virus that is injected into the body of person who is suffering from flu. Some of the common side effects one can experience include headache, soreness, and fever. Generally this process of injecting is approved for healthy persons older than 6 months, Asthma Patients, Diabetic Patients and Chronic lung disease Patients Nasal Spray is made with weakened live flu virus and given with a mist sprayed in noise and generally approved for all healthy people between the ages of 2 and 49, but not for pregnant women.

When to Vaccinate?

One gets the flu shot or spray shortly after its available each year. Early Immunization is recommended for most effective results. Being not vaccinated increases the chance of spreading the disease to others in family and neighbors.

Where to Get Vaccine?

The physicians at Doctors Immediate Care have a tremendous experience of delivering quick and efficient Professional Health Care at a reasonable price can make sure you’ve had all the vaccinations you need. You can also directly walk-in into our clinics with out any appointment.

Young doctor and his assistant preparing a botox treatment around the eyes of a mature woman lying on a table in a beauty clinic

Doctors Immediate Care Inc provides Botox cosmetic treatments. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why Botox?

Men and women alike experience the break down of collagen and elastin fibers in the skin causing facial lines and wrinkles. After many years of laughing, squinting, frowning and smoking, the skin around the eyes, mouth and forehead will begin to develop expression lines. These lines can make you look older, tired and stressed. Up until recently these lines have been very hard to treat effectively. Now there’s BOTOX cosmetic, which minimizes the facial motion that is creating these wrinkles.

Benefits

The greatest benefit to injectables like BOTOX is that the results are instant. You don’t have to wait weeks or months to see the dramatic effects!

How long does it last?

BOTOX will noticeably improve lines within 2-3 days and will last for four months. Some patients choose to regularly schedule BOTEX injections every four months, while others chose to get BOTEX treatments for special occasions or once or twice a year.

On which areas of the face and body do you use Botox?

The most common areas are the glabellar line (between the eyebrows), the forehead, and around the eyes. Not only does Botox minimize the appearance of lines, it also lifts the eyebrows to open the eyes.

 

Got a runny nose? Sneezing? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is a runny nose?

A runny nose is excess drainage produced by nasal and adjacent tissues and blood vessels in the nose. This drainage may range from a clear fluid to thick mucus. Runny nose drainage may run out of your nose, down the back of your throat or both.

The terms “rhinorrhea” and “rhinitis” are often used to refer to a runny nose. Strictly speaking though, rhinorrhea refers to a thin, relatively clear nasal discharge. Rhinitis refers to inflammation of the nasal tissues from a number of causes, which usually results in a runny nose.

Nasal congestion may or may not accompany runny nose.

Why do I suddenly have a runny nose?

Runny nose can be caused by anything that irritates or inflames the nasal tissues. Infections such as the common cold and influenza. Allergies and various irritants may all cause a runny nose. Acute sinusitis or sinus infection can cause a runny nose.

How long does a runny nose last?

Usually there is no fever; in fact, fever and more severe symptoms may indicate that you have the flu rather than a cold. Cold symptoms typically last for about 3 days. At that point the worst is over, but you may feel congested for a week or more.

Why do I have runny nose every morning?

In most cases, when you have allergic rhinitis, you sneeze again and again, especially after you wake up in the morning. The drainage from a runny nose caused by allergies is usually clear and thin. But it may become thicker and cloudy or yellowish if you get a nasal or sinus infection.


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