Has a cold got you down? The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

How does a cold start?
It usually begins with a sore throat or sneezing, and before you know it, you’ve also got these symptoms:

Runny nose (clear and watery)
Sneezing
Fatigue
Cough

You usually don’t get a fever with a cold. If you do, it may be a sign you’ve got the flu or an infection with a bacteria.

What is the first sign of a cold?

The first sign of a cold is usually a sore or irritated throat and is typically followed by early symptoms such as a headache, chilliness or lethargy. These develop quickly and can last one to two days. During the first few days, your nose may also start to run.

How long does a cold last for?

Cold symptoms usually start 2 or 3 days after a person has been exposed to the virus. People with colds are most contagious for the first 3 or 4 days after the symptoms begin and can be contagious for up to 3 weeks. Although some colds can linger for as long as 2 weeks, most clear up within a week.

How do I know if I have the flu or a cold?

The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue. Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose.

How does a cold start?

This can happen by direct physical contact with someone who has a cold, or by touching a surface contaminated with their germs and then touching your nose or mouth. You can also catch it from infected droplets in the air released by a sneeze or a cough.

How do you know you re getting a cold?

Signs and symptoms, which can vary from person to person, might include:

1. Runny or stuffy nose
2. Sore throat
3. Cough
4. Congestion
5. Slight body aches or a mild headache
6. Sneezing
7. Low-grade fever
8. Generally feeling unwell (malaise)


Types of Physical Exams

Your primary care provider (PCP) conducts regular tests to determine the status of your overall health. One can discuss changes or problems during those meetings with your PCP. In the following article, let’s look at various types of Physical exams.

Primary care health screening

Many students schedule a periodic physical exam to check on their health. Primary care health screenings are covered by the student health fee and has no charge.

Third-party-requested physical exam

This is a physical examination required by a third party, usually a potential employer or a study abroad program. This type of physical is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. If lab tests or immunizations are required to complete this physical, there is also a charge for those.

Peace Corps physical exam

This is a specific type of third-party physical with an extensive physical exam. It is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. There is also a charge for any immunizations required to complete the exam. Read the complete article here…

The next question which arises is what exactly happens during the Physical exam?

What are the areas of your body that the examiner inspects? In the following article, we look at it in detail.

The Physical Examination and Health Assessment

Many people who visit the doctor or health care provider’s office wonder: “What are they doing?”, “What are they looking for?” During a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider may be looking for as they are gathering cues and clues during the short time you are in the office. Some of the clues are based on the spoken information that you provide, or they may be based on physical examination findings.

During a health assessment, diagnosing an illness, disorder, or a condition is like a puzzle. Diagnosis often includes laboratory studies, radiology studies to look at certain organs, and the physical exam itself.  This process is called data collection. Before modern technology, it was important for health care providers to perfect their physical examination techniques, because x-ray machines, scanners, and echocardiograms were non-existent.

In a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider can find out by using their hands to feel (palpate), stethoscope and ears to listen, and eyes to see.  Findings that are present on the physical exam may by themselves diagnose, or be helpful to diagnose, many diseases. The components of a physical exam include:

Physical Examination and Inspection

Your examiner will look at, or “inspect” specific areas of your body for normal color, shape and consistency. Certain findings on “inspection” may alert your health care provider to focus other parts of the physical exam on certain areas of your body. For example, your legs may be swollen. Your health care provider will then pay special attention to the common things that cause leg swelling, such as extra fluid caused by your heart, and use this information to help them make a diagnosis.  Common areas that are inspected may include:

  • Your skin – to look for bruising, cuts, moles or lumps
  • Your face and eyes – to see if they are even and “normal”
  • Your neck veins – to see if these are bulging, distended (swollen)
  • Your chest and abdomen (stomach area) – to see if there are any masses, or bulges
  • Your legs – to see if there are any swelling
  • Your muscles – to check for good muscle tone
  • Your elbows and joints – check for swelling and inflammation, if any deformities are present. Click here to know more…
  • Once your physical examination is done then it’s time to wait for reports and an update from your doctor.
Got body aches? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call the office in your location to make an appointment. Body aches, pains, soreness, and tenderness can affect one, two, or many parts of the body. It also may feel like your entire body is painful or tender to the touch. Body aches and pains can persistently affect one area only, can shift and affect another area or areas, and can migrate all over and affect many areas over and over again.
Why is my whole body aching?

Hyperstimulation can cause the body’s muscles to remain tight even though the immediate threat has passed. Headaches, muscle pain, muscle tension, tight muscles, body aches and pains, and stiffness are all common symptoms of stress-response hyperstimulation. This can also be a cause of persistent body aches and pains.

Why does my body ache and I feel tired all the time?

Chronic fatigue syndrome. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition that causes you to feel exhausted and weak, no matter how much rest or sleep you get. It often causes insomnia. Because your body doesn’t feel rested or replenished, CFS can also cause aches in the muscles and joints throughout your body.

What can cause unexplained muscle pain?

The most common causes of muscle pain are tension, stress, overuse and minor injuries. Systemic muscle pain or pain throughout your whole body is more often the result of an infection, an illness or a side effect of a medication. Common causes of muscle pain include: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome.


Doctors Immediate Care
18W511 Roosevelt Rd
Lombard, IL 60148
(630) 448-6724

Open Daily: Mon – Fri 9am – 7:30pm  Saturday: 9am – 4pm  Closed Sunday

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Medicine doctor hand working Professional doctor use computer and medical equipment all around, desktop top view

If you believe you have a sexually transmitted disease, (STD) it’s important to be tested and get proper treatment right away. The board certified physicians at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment today.

The STD Lab Panel contains the following tests:

    • Chlamydia Test
    • Gonorrhea Test
    • HIV-1 Antibodies Test
    • Syphilis Test
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type I
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type II
    • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
    • Hepatitis B Core Antibodies Total
    • Hepatitis C Antibody

Insured Patients – Some or all of included services may be covered by your insurance plan. Please check with your insurance provider before scheduling an appointment. As a courtesy, we will file a claim on your behalf to insurance companies we are in-network with.

Gonorrhea and Chlamydia

These STDs often co-exist in the same infected individual and can be passed simultaneously to a sexual partner. Since treatment for each of these conditions may differ, it’s an excellent medical practice to test for both if either one is suspected. Furthermore, these serious STDs may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, if they are not treated, they can cause pain and serious health problems, such as arthritis and infertility.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a serious bacterial infection. It’s usually passed from one person to another by sexual contact. If it’s not treated, syphilis can lead to permanent brain, nerve, and tissue damage.

Herpes (HSV)

Genital herpes is a common STD caused by a virus. The virus is called the herpes simplex virus or HSV. It causes painful blisters that break open and form sores in the genital area.

HIV-1 Infection and AIDS

HIV is the abbreviation used for the human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a life-threatening disease.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed and tender. It may also become swollen. Areas of liver tissue may be destroyed by the inflammation. Hepatitis B is a serious, sometimes severe and even fatal type of hepatitis. In addition to being a sexually transmitted disease (STD), Hepatitis B is a blood-borne pathogen and exposure to the blood of an infected person may result in infection.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed. Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. The virus is spread mainly through contact with infected blood. Sometimes it’s spread through sexual contact.

Medical doctor drawing allergy on the virtual screen.

What is a food allergy?

When you have a food allergy, your body thinks certain foods are trying to harm you. Your body fights back by setting off an allergic reaction. In most cases, the symptoms are mild—a rash, a stuffy nose, or an upset stomach. A serious reaction can be deadly.

Allergies tend to run in families. You’re more likely to have a food allergy if other people in your family have allergies like hay fever, asthma, or eczema (atopic dermatitis).

Food allergies are more common in children than adults. About 7 out of 100 kids have them but only about 2 out of 100 adults do. Children often outgrow their food allergies, but if you have a food allergy as an adult, you will most likely have it for life.

What are the symptoms?

Food allergies can cause many different symptoms. They can range from mild to serious. Your mouth may tingle, and your lips may swell. Other symptoms include:

•Cramps, an upset stomach, or diarrhea
•Itchy skin with red, raised bumps called hives
•Stuffy nose, wheezing, or shortness of breath
•Dizziness or lightheaded

Kids usually have the same symptoms as adults, but sometimes a small child will cry persistently, vomit, have diarrhea, or not grow as expected. If your child has any of these symptoms, see your doctor.

Some people have symptoms after eating even a tiny bit of food. As a rule, the sooner the reaction begins, the worse it will be:

•Your throat and tongue may swell quickly
•You may suddenly start wheezing or have trouble breathing
•You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit
•You may feel faint or pass out

Note: If you have (or see someone having) any of these symptoms, call 911 right away.

What foods most often cause a food allergy?

A few foods cause most allergies. A food that causes an allergy is called a food allergen. Usually it is the protein in a food that causes the problem.

•Eggs, milk, peanuts, wheat, soy, and fish cause most problems in children. Most kids outgrow allergies to milk, wheat, eggs, and soy by the time they are 5. But kids rarely outgrow an allergy to peanuts or fish.
•Peanuts, tree nuts (like walnuts or almonds), fish, and shellfish cause most problems in adults.
•If you are allergic to one food, you may also be allergic to other foods like it. So if you are allergic to peanuts, you may also be allergic to soybeans or peas.

How is a food allergy diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask questions about your medical history and do a physical exam. Your doctor will also ask what symptoms you have.

If your doctor thinks you could have a serious food allergy, you may have a skin test. The doctor will put a little bit of liquid on your skin and then prick your skin. The liquid has some of the possible food allergen in it. If your skin swells up like a mosquito bite, your doctor knows you are allergic to that food. Your doctor may also do blood tests to look for the chemicals in your blood that cause an allergic reaction.

How is a food allergy treated?

The best treatment is to never eat the foods you are allergic to. Learn to read food labels and spot other names for problem foods. For example, milk may be listed as “caseinate,” wheat as “gluten,” and peanuts as “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.” When you eat out or at other people’s houses, ask about the foods you are served

If you do eat a food you are allergic to, medicines can help. You may be able to stop a mild reaction by taking over-the-counter antihistamines. You may need prescription medicines if over-the-counter drugs don’t help or if they cause side effects, such as making you feel sleepy.

Next Steps

Poor health can significantly affect your life. Improve your life by creating good health habits. Call your local office to schedule an appointment with one of our doctors for evaluation and testing.

Feeling under the weather? Think you may have the flu? The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is the flu?

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system — your nose, throat and lungs. Influenza is commonly called the flu, but it’s not the same as stomach “flu” viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

For most people, influenza resolves on its own. But sometimes, influenza and its complications can be deadly. People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

  • Young children under age 5, and especially those under 2 years
  • Adults older than age 65
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • Pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • People who have chronic illnesses such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease and diabetes
  • People who are very obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher

The annual influenza vaccine is your best defense against the flu.

What are the beginning signs of the flu?

Common signs and symptoms of the flu include:

– Fever over 100.4 F (38 C)
– Aching muscles, especially in your back, arms and legs
– Chills and sweats
– Headache
– Dry, persistent cough
– Fatigue and weakness
– Nasal congestion
Sore throat

How long does it take to get over the flu?

A bout of the flu typically lasts one to two weeks, with severe symptoms subsiding in two to three days. However, weakness, fatigue, dry cough, and a reduced ability to exercise can linger for three to seven days.

What is the difference between influenza A and B?

While the symptoms of influenza B mirrors those of A, the main difference between the two strains is who it can affect. This allows strains of A to be spread more rapidly than B, while also meaning strains of B cannot cause pandemics with symptoms likely less severe. Flu shots protect against both strains of influenza.

How contagious is the flu?

The Flu Is Contagious. Most healthy adults may be able to infect other people beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Children may pass the virus for longer than 7 days. Symptoms start 1 to 4 days after the virus enters the body.

Is it a cold or the flu?

The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose.


When you get sick and are in need of urgent care you only want the quickest service available in your area, whether its during the week or weekend, care becomes an urgency no matter what.

A trip to an immediate care clinic is just what the doctor ordered.

Immediate care facilities are more popular and becoming known for assisting those with an urgency by walking in and waiting. Most are equipped with state of the art equipment to diagnose and treat most minor injuries and sicknesses.

To Wait or Not to Wait

When a patient is feeling sick, they do not want to wait hours and hours to see a doctor at an emergency room, and immediate care clinic is your best choice by searching for an urgent care clinic near you, you can get the immediate care within minutes.

Most immediate care facilities are equipped to handle most minor sicknesses of life in and out in a hurry. Search Doctors Immediate care near you, they have facilities that are perfect for the times in life when stitches are required for a cut and any non life threatening emergency happens, when broken bones must be treated and you need a few stitches.

When minutes matter, and you need non emergency immediate care, seek help at an urgent care facility like Doctors Immediate Care because that is all you may have time for.

Find a Location Near You

With many locations in the greater Chicago area, you’ll find clinics in Lombard, Lisle and Lincolnwood areas for immediate assistance.

Immediate care facilities are equipped with state of the art equipment to diagnosis and treat the minor injuries and sicknesses that make life a problem. When a patient is feeling bad, they do not want to wait hours and hours to see a doctor at an emergency room.

Instead, most immediate care facilities are equipped to deliver the minor sicknesses of life in and out in a hurry. Immediate care facilities are also perfect for the times in life when stitches are required for a cut.

Immediate care facilities are also excellent for the times in life when broken bones must be treated.

Urgent care facilities, on the other hand, are important for the minor sicknesses and quick visits.

When minutes matter, and you need non emergency immediate care, seek help at an urgent care facility like Doctors Immediate Care because that is all you may have time for.

If you find yourself feeling nauseous, the medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is nausea?

Nausea is an unpleasant sensation of discomfort or unease in the stomach (queasy stomach), accompanied by an urge to vomit. Nausea often precedes vomiting.

What does it mean when you feel nausea?

Nausea is a common symptom that may accompany many diseases and conditions. Common causes of nausea include drug side effects, food poisoning, motion sickness, pregnancy, and drinking too much alcohol. Nausea is often accompanied by symptoms of gastrointestinal distress such as diarrhea.

How do I stop feeling nauseous?

If you are already feeling nauseated, these tips may help you avoid vomiting:

1. Sit down or lie in a propped-up position. Physical activity will make you feel worse.
2. Drink a small amount of a sweet beverage such as ginger ale or Gatorade. …
3. Have a popsicle or a similar sweetened ice treat.

Can stress and anxiety cause nausea?

Since acute or chronic stress, fear, and anxiety can cause the body to function abnormally, they can cause a number of stomach and intestinal distresses including nausea, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, “lump in the stomach,” constipation, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and general stomach malaise, to name a few.

Why do I feel nauseous and dizzy?

Causes of dizziness. Common causes of dizziness include a migraine, medications, and alcohol. It can also be caused by a problem in the inner ear, where balance is regulated. The most common cause of vertigo and vertigo-related dizziness is benign positional vertigo (BPV).

What are the main causes of nausea?

Common causes of nausea are described below:

– Heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
– Infection or virus
– Medications
– Motion sickness and seasickness
– Diet
– Pain
– Ulcer


Drug screen result form, pills, stethoscope. Medicine, spoon, stethoscope, drug screen result form. Abuse of drugs harm for life.

Doctors Immediate Care offers drug screenings. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why drug test?

Drug screening tests play a crucial role in the job recruitment process. The screening includes urine, hair, blood, saliva and sweat testing.

Doctors Immediate Care has well-qualified doctors, lab assistants and nurses to determine healthy candidates for employers. We understand time is a factor, so tests are administered efficiently and results are provided quickly.

 

Doctors Immediate Care © 2018 Privacy Policy