Young doctor and his assistant preparing a botox treatment around the eyes of a mature woman lying on a table in a beauty clinic

Doctors Immediate Care Inc provides Botox cosmetic treatments. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why Botox?

Men and women alike experience the break down of collagen and elastin fibers in the skin causing facial lines and wrinkles. After many years of laughing, squinting, frowning and smoking, the skin around the eyes, mouth and forehead will begin to develop expression lines. These lines can make you look older, tired and stressed. Up until recently these lines have been very hard to treat effectively. Now there’s BOTOX cosmetic, which minimizes the facial motion that is creating these wrinkles.

Benefits

The greatest benefit to injectables like BOTOX is that the results are instant. You don’t have to wait weeks or months to see the dramatic effects!

How long does it last?

BOTOX will noticeably improve lines within 2-3 days and will last for four months. Some patients choose to regularly schedule BOTEX injections every four months, while others chose to get BOTEX treatments for special occasions or once or twice a year.

On which areas of the face and body do you use Botox?

The most common areas are the glabellar line (between the eyebrows), the forehead, and around the eyes. Not only does Botox minimize the appearance of lines, it also lifts the eyebrows to open the eyes.

 

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) takes place from Dec 7-13th every year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established the NIVW in 2005 to highlight the significance of an influenza vaccine. Getting a flu shot is the best way to prevent this influenza referred as the flu. It typically peaks from December to February and last as late as May and it’s the peak-time to get the flu shot.

Vaccination to keep away from the Flu

The Flu viruses are spreading and the people are getting sick. If you don’t want to be one among them, then get the flu shot now to enjoy the year-round with your friends and family without the “flu fear”. Vaccination is the best step to protect yourself and your loved ones against the flu. It is very important to get the flu vaccine every year.

Who needs the Flu shot?

According to the CDC, everyone, from 6 months to older will have to get the vaccination to protect themselves against the contagious flu. Some children from 6 months through 8 years will require two doses for complete protection. And the Children of this age group who are getting the shot for the first time should get two doses spaced at least 28 days apart. Your child’s Doctor can better tell you if your child requires two doses.

Types of Flu Vaccine

There are several options for this 2014-15 season:

The Trivalent flu vaccine protects against three different flu viruses, two influenza A viruses and influenza B virus.
The Quadrivalent flu vaccine protects against four different flu viruses, two influenza A viruses and influenza B virus.
Ask your Doctor to know which vaccine to get.

Where can I get the Vaccination?
If your doctor’s office is closed, you can find the nearest locations where the flu shots are available like local health department or pharmacy. You can use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to trace the nearest flu vaccine location by simply entering the zip code.

Check if you are at High Risk

The flu related complications can lead to one’s death. The People at high risk include:

• Pregnant women
• People with chronic conditions like diabetes, asthma, heart disease.
• Children under 5 years, and those of 65 years and older
• People living in nursing homes and such long-term care facility
• People around those who are at high risk like health care workers, household contacts
• And also caregivers

CDC has a complete list of the people who are at high risk of serious flu related complications, check hereand also check here if you should get vaccinated.

Get your flu shot today! Get it to live the year-round happily with your loved ones, without the “flu fear”.


Flu-Shots-special

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Got a runny nose? Sneezing? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is a runny nose?

A runny nose is excess drainage produced by nasal and adjacent tissues and blood vessels in the nose. This drainage may range from a clear fluid to thick mucus. Runny nose drainage may run out of your nose, down the back of your throat or both.

The terms “rhinorrhea” and “rhinitis” are often used to refer to a runny nose. Strictly speaking though, rhinorrhea refers to a thin, relatively clear nasal discharge. Rhinitis refers to inflammation of the nasal tissues from a number of causes, which usually results in a runny nose.

Nasal congestion may or may not accompany runny nose.

Why do I suddenly have a runny nose?

Runny nose can be caused by anything that irritates or inflames the nasal tissues. Infections such as the common cold and influenza. Allergies and various irritants may all cause a runny nose. Acute sinusitis or sinus infection can cause a runny nose.

How long does a runny nose last?

Usually there is no fever; in fact, fever and more severe symptoms may indicate that you have the flu rather than a cold. Cold symptoms typically last for about 3 days. At that point the worst is over, but you may feel congested for a week or more.

Why do I have runny nose every morning?

In most cases, when you have allergic rhinitis, you sneeze again and again, especially after you wake up in the morning. The drainage from a runny nose caused by allergies is usually clear and thin. But it may become thicker and cloudy or yellowish if you get a nasal or sinus infection.


Medical doctor drawing allergy on the virtual screen.

What is a food allergy?

When you have a food allergy, your body thinks certain foods are trying to harm you. Your body fights back by setting off an allergic reaction. In most cases, the symptoms are mild—a rash, a stuffy nose, or an upset stomach. A serious reaction can be deadly.

Allergies tend to run in families. You’re more likely to have a food allergy if other people in your family have allergies like hay fever, asthma, or eczema (atopic dermatitis).

Food allergies are more common in children than adults. About 7 out of 100 kids have them but only about 2 out of 100 adults do. Children often outgrow their food allergies, but if you have a food allergy as an adult, you will most likely have it for life.

What are the symptoms?

Food allergies can cause many different symptoms. They can range from mild to serious. Your mouth may tingle, and your lips may swell. Other symptoms include:

•Cramps, an upset stomach, or diarrhea
•Itchy skin with red, raised bumps called hives
•Stuffy nose, wheezing, or shortness of breath
•Dizziness or lightheaded

Kids usually have the same symptoms as adults, but sometimes a small child will cry persistently, vomit, have diarrhea, or not grow as expected. If your child has any of these symptoms, see your doctor.

Some people have symptoms after eating even a tiny bit of food. As a rule, the sooner the reaction begins, the worse it will be:

•Your throat and tongue may swell quickly
•You may suddenly start wheezing or have trouble breathing
•You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit
•You may feel faint or pass out

Note: If you have (or see someone having) any of these symptoms, call 911 right away.

What foods most often cause a food allergy?

A few foods cause most allergies. A food that causes an allergy is called a food allergen. Usually it is the protein in a food that causes the problem.

•Eggs, milk, peanuts, wheat, soy, and fish cause most problems in children. Most kids outgrow allergies to milk, wheat, eggs, and soy by the time they are 5. But kids rarely outgrow an allergy to peanuts or fish.
•Peanuts, tree nuts (like walnuts or almonds), fish, and shellfish cause most problems in adults.
•If you are allergic to one food, you may also be allergic to other foods like it. So if you are allergic to peanuts, you may also be allergic to soybeans or peas.

How is a food allergy diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask questions about your medical history and do a physical exam. Your doctor will also ask what symptoms you have.

If your doctor thinks you could have a serious food allergy, you may have a skin test. The doctor will put a little bit of liquid on your skin and then prick your skin. The liquid has some of the possible food allergen in it. If your skin swells up like a mosquito bite, your doctor knows you are allergic to that food. Your doctor may also do blood tests to look for the chemicals in your blood that cause an allergic reaction.

How is a food allergy treated?

The best treatment is to never eat the foods you are allergic to. Learn to read food labels and spot other names for problem foods. For example, milk may be listed as “caseinate,” wheat as “gluten,” and peanuts as “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.” When you eat out or at other people’s houses, ask about the foods you are served

If you do eat a food you are allergic to, medicines can help. You may be able to stop a mild reaction by taking over-the-counter antihistamines. You may need prescription medicines if over-the-counter drugs don’t help or if they cause side effects, such as making you feel sleepy.

Next Steps

Poor health can significantly affect your life. Improve your life by creating good health habits. Call your local office to schedule an appointment with one of our doctors for evaluation and testing.

Found yourself with a fever? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call the office in your location to make an appointment.

What is a fever?

A fever is a temporary increase in your body temperature, often due to an illness. Having a fever is a sign that something out of the ordinary is going on in your body.

For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but usually isn’t a cause for concern unless it reaches 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. For infants and toddlers, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.

Fevers generally go away within a few days. A number of over-the-counter medications lower a fever, but sometimes it’s better left untreated. Fever seems to play a key role in helping your body fight off a number of infections.

What causes fever?

In response to an infection, illness, or some other cause, the hypothalamus may reset the body to a higher temperature. Although the most common causes of fever are common infections such as colds and gastroenteritis, other causes include: Infections of the ear, lung, skin, throat, bladder, or kidney.

What are the symptoms of fever?

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

– Sweating.
– Chills and shivering.
– Headache.
– Muscle aches.
– Loss of appetite.
– Irritability.
– Dehydration.
– General weakness.

Is a fever contagious?

No matter the illness, keep your child home if she has a fever. It may seem harmless enough, but assume any fever is a symptom of a contagious condition. Viruses that cause fevers are contagious as long as the fever is above a 100.4 degrees F.

How long do fevers last?

The type of infection causing the fever usually determines how often the fever recurs and how long the fever lasts. Fevers due to viruses can last for as little as two to three days and sometime as long as two weeks. A fever caused by a bacterial infection may continue until the child is treated with an antibiotic.

How long are you contagious with a fever?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recommends staying home for 24 hours after a fever and other flu-like symptoms (chills, sweating, flushed skin) have cleared up.

When should you worry about a fever?

1. If the temperature is 103 F (39.4 C) or greater (fever is too high)
2. If the fever lasts more than seven days.
3. If the fever symptoms get worse (concern if fever is increasing toward 39.4 C)


Types of Physical Exams

Your primary care provider (PCP) conducts regular tests to determine the status of your overall health. One can discuss changes or problems during those meetings with your PCP. In the following article, let’s look at various types of Physical exams.

Primary care health screening

Many students schedule a periodic physical exam to check on their health. Primary care health screenings are covered by the student health fee and has no charge.

Third-party-requested physical exam

This is a physical examination required by a third party, usually a potential employer or a study abroad program. This type of physical is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. If lab tests or immunizations are required to complete this physical, there is also a charge for those.

Peace Corps physical exam

This is a specific type of third-party physical with an extensive physical exam. It is not covered by the student health fee and has an additional charge. There is also a charge for any immunizations required to complete the exam. Read the complete article here…

The next question which arises is what exactly happens during the Physical exam?

What are the areas of your body that the examiner inspects? In the following article, we look at it in detail.

The Physical Examination and Health Assessment

Many people who visit the doctor or health care provider’s office wonder: “What are they doing?”, “What are they looking for?” During a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider may be looking for as they are gathering cues and clues during the short time you are in the office. Some of the clues are based on the spoken information that you provide, or they may be based on physical examination findings.

During a health assessment, diagnosing an illness, disorder, or a condition is like a puzzle. Diagnosis often includes laboratory studies, radiology studies to look at certain organs, and the physical exam itself.  This process is called data collection. Before modern technology, it was important for health care providers to perfect their physical examination techniques, because x-ray machines, scanners, and echocardiograms were non-existent.

In a physical examination, there are many things that your health care provider can find out by using their hands to feel (palpate), stethoscope and ears to listen, and eyes to see.  Findings that are present on the physical exam may by themselves diagnose, or be helpful to diagnose, many diseases. The components of a physical exam include:

Physical Examination and Inspection

Your examiner will look at, or “inspect” specific areas of your body for normal color, shape and consistency. Certain findings on “inspection” may alert your health care provider to focus other parts of the physical exam on certain areas of your body. For example, your legs may be swollen. Your health care provider will then pay special attention to the common things that cause leg swelling, such as extra fluid caused by your heart, and use this information to help them make a diagnosis.  Common areas that are inspected may include:

  • Your skin – to look for bruising, cuts, moles or lumps
  • Your face and eyes – to see if they are even and “normal”
  • Your neck veins – to see if these are bulging, distended (swollen)
  • Your chest and abdomen (stomach area) – to see if there are any masses, or bulges
  • Your legs – to see if there are any swelling
  • Your muscles – to check for good muscle tone
  • Your elbows and joints – check for swelling and inflammation, if any deformities are present. Click here to know more…
  • Once your physical examination is done then it’s time to wait for reports and an update from your doctor.
[responsive]Low Cost vaccinations[/responsive] Doctors Immediate Care offers low cost vaccinations. Please call your local office to make an appointment.

What vaccinations does Doctors Immediate Care provide?

Doctors Immediate Care can provide Hep B, HIB, DTaP, IPV, Prevnar, Rotatek, CBC and lead level, MMR, Varicella, Meningococcal , HPV #1, HPV #2, HPV #3, Gardasil, Zoster( Shingles).
Vaccines play an important role in keeping us healthy. They protect us from serious and sometimes deadly diseases. Please call our offices to schedule an appointment. Read answers to common questions to learn more about vaccine safety, the recommended schedule, how vaccines protect your child from 14 diseases by age two, and more.

Q: Are vaccines safe?

A: Yes. Vaccines are very safe. The United States’ long-standing vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. Currently, the United States has the safest vaccine supply in its history. Millions of children safely receive vaccines each year. The most common side effects are typically very mild, such as pain or swelling at the injection site.

Q: What are the side effects of the vaccines? How do I treat them?

A: Vaccines, like any medication, may cause some side effects. Most of these side effects are very minor, like soreness where the shot was given, fussiness, or a low-grade fever. These side effects typically only last a couple of days and are treatable. For example, you can apply a cool, wet washcloth on the sore area to ease discomfort. Serious reactions are very rare. However, if your child experiences any reactions that concern you, call the doctor’s office.

Q: What are the risks and benefits of vaccines?

A: Vaccines can prevent infectious diseases that once killed or harmed many infants, children, and adults. Without vaccines, your child is at risk for getting seriously ill and suffering pain, disability, and even death from diseases like measles and whooping cough. The main risks associated with getting vaccines are side effects, which are almost always mild (redness and swelling at the injection site) and go away within a few days. Serious side effects after vaccination, such as a severe allergic reaction, are very rare and doctors and clinic staff are trained to deal with them. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children. The only exceptions to this are cases in which a child has a serious chronic medical condition like cancer or a disease that weakens the immune system, or has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous vaccine dose.

Q: Is there a link between vaccines and autism?

A: No. Scientific studies and reviews continue to show no relationship between vaccines and autism. Some people have suggested that thimerosal (a compound that contains mercury) in vaccines given to infants and young children might be a cause of autism. Others have suggested that the MMR (measles- mumps-rubella) vaccine may be linked to autism. However, numerous scientists and researchers have studied and continue to study the MMR vaccine and thimerosal, and reach the same conclusion: there is no link between MMR vaccine or thimerosal and autism.

Q: Why do vaccines start so early?

A: The recommended schedule protects infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they come into contact with life-threatening diseases. Children receive immunization early because they are susceptible to diseases at a young age. The consequences of these diseases can be very serious, even life-threatening, for infants and young children.

Q: Haven’t we gotten rid of most of these diseases in this country?

A: Some vaccine-preventable diseases, like pertussis (whooping cough) and chickenpox, remain common in the United States. On the other hand, other diseases vaccines prevent are no longer common in this country because of vaccines. However, if we stopped vaccinating, the few cases we have in the United States could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases. Even though many serious vaccine-preventable diseases are uncommon in the United States, some are common in other parts of the world. Even if your family does not travel internationally, you could come into contact with international travelers anywhere in your community. Children who don’t receive all vaccinations and are exposed to a disease can become seriously sick and spread it through a community.

Q: Why does my child need a chickenpox shot? Isn’t it a mild disease?

A: Your child needs a chickenpox vaccine because chickenpox can actually be a serious disease. In many cases, children experience a mild case of chickenpox, but other children may have blisters that become infected. Others may develop pneumonia. There is no way to tell in advance how severe your child’s symptoms will be. Before vaccine was available, about 50 children died every year from chickenpox, and about 1 in 500 children who got chickenpox was hospitalized.

Q: My child is sick right now. Is it okay for her to still get shots?

A: Talk with your child’s doctor, but children can usually get vaccinated even if they have a mild illness like a cold, earache, mild fever, or diarrhea. If the doctor says it is okay, your child can still get vaccinated.

Q: What are the ingredients in vaccines and what do they do?

A: Vaccines contain ingredients that cause the body to develop immunity. Vaccines also contain very small amounts of other ingredients. All ingredients play necessary roles either in making the vaccine, or in ensuring that the final product is safe and effective.

Q: Don’t infants have natural immunity? Isn’t natural immunity better than the kind from vaccines?

A: Babies may get some temporary immunity (protection) from mom during the last few weeks of pregnancy, but only for diseases to which mom is immune. Breastfeeding may also protect your baby temporarily from minor infections, like colds. These antibodies do not last long, leaving your baby vulnerable to disease. Natural immunity occurs when your child is exposed to a disease and becomes infected. It is true that natural immunity usually results in better immunity than vaccination, but the risks are much greater. A natural chickenpox infection may result in pneumonia, whereas the vaccine might only cause a sore arm for a couple of days.

Q: Can’t I just wait to vaccinate my baby, since he isn’t in child care, where he could be exposed to diseases?

A: No, even young children who are cared for at home can be exposed to vaccine preventable diseases, so it’s important for them to get all their vaccines at the recommended ages. Children can catch these illnesses from any number of people or places, including from parents, brothers or sisters, visitors to their home, on playgrounds or even at the grocery store. Regardless of whether or not your baby is cared for outside the home, she comes in contact with people throughout the day, some of whom may be sick but not know it yet. If someone has a vaccine preventable disease, they may not have symptoms or the symptoms may be mild, and they can end up spreading disease to babies or young children.  Remember, many of these diseases can be especially dangerous to young children so it is safest to vaccinate your child at the recommended ages to protect her, whether or not she is in child care.

Q: Do I have to vaccinate my baby on schedule if I’m breastfeeding him?

A: Yes, even breastfed babies need to be protected with vaccines at the recommended ages. The immune system is not fully developed at birth, which puts newborns at greater risk for infections. Breast milk provides important protection from some infections as your baby’s immune system is developing. For example, babies who are breastfed have a lower risk of ear infections, respiratory tract infections, and diarrhea. However, breast milk does not protect children against all diseases. Even in breastfed infants, vaccines are the most effective way to prevent many diseases. Your baby needs the long-term protection that can only come from making sure he receives all his vaccines according to the CDC’s recommended schedule.

Q: What’s wrong with delaying some of my baby’s vaccines if I’m planning to get them all eventually?

A: Young children have the highest risk of having a serious case of disease that could cause hospitalization or death. Delaying or spreading out vaccine doses leaves your child unprotected during the time when they need vaccine protection the most. For example, diseases such as Hib or pneumococcus almost always occur in the first 2 years of a baby’s life. And some diseases, like Hepatitis B and whooping cough (pertussis), are more serious when babies get them at a younger age. Vaccinating your child according to the CDC’s recommended immunization schedule means you can help protect him at a young age.

Doctors Immediate Care is pleased to provide comprehensive travel medicine to our patients who travel internationally. Immunization and medication prescriptions are available on-site. The services are rendered based on CDC recommendations, individual health status and travel circumstances.

Make copies of your passport, air tickets, all credit cards you take with you, and any other documents to facilitate reporting a loss and replacing them. If you are planning on traveling outside the country, there are many things you need to prepare in addition to Passports and visas. You would also need to get vaccinated as it’s required by most countries before you travel.

What types of travel vaccines are there?

Travel vaccines are divided into three categories: routine, recommended, and required. Requirements for each country are different. Plus, there are different schedules for adults and children. The physicians at Doctors Immediate Care can advise you as to which ones you should have. It’s important to remember that most vaccines take time to become effective in your body and some vaccines must be given in a series over a period of days or sometimes weeks. A traveler who is not vaccinated is at risk for infection.

You may need additional vaccines if you are travelling outside the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides information to assist travelers and their healthcare providers in deciding which vaccines, medications, and other measures are necessary to prevent illness and injury during international travel.Visit CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/travel or call 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636).

How to Select a Pediatrician

If it’s been 28 weeks into pregnancy, now is the time for you to find a pediatrician who can help you with taking care of your baby. Having a doctor whom you trust is important since you might need the assistance from time to time for your newborn. In the article below, we look at how to find the right Pediatrician.

The best time to start looking for a pediatrician is between 28 and 34 weeks into your pregnancy when you likely know what you want and have at least a few weeks to do your homework. The process may seem daunting, but realize you’re not trying to find the Best Pediatrician in the World — you’re looking for the best one for your child and one who has personal connection with you.

Research Doctors

One person’s pick is sometimes another’s pan, which is why you should collect at least three if not half a dozen names from friends and coworkers. (If you’re short on names, try the American Academy of Pediatrics’ referral site at aap.org/referral.) Call your insurance company about any doctor you’re interested in but don’t see on the list — provider lists change frequently, and the pediatrician may have been added recently.

Next, scout out the location of the pediatrician’s office. Given how often you’ll be schlepping there, you’ll want a short commute. The day that my then 8-month-old daughter suddenly developed a weird body rash, I loved that I was able to call, drive to the office, and be in an exam room within 20 minutes. Also look into which hospitals your candidates are affiliated with; you’ll want one that’s both convenient and reputable. Know more…

Once you decide which pediatrician to have, the next step is to look at the questions that you should ask.

Expecting a New Baby? Top Questions to Ask Potential Pediatricians

It comes down to visiting and interviewing potential pediatricians for a meet and greet. But if you’re a first-time mom or perhaps find yourself starting a new search, you might not know the right questions to ask or where to even begin.

Don’t worry—I’ve got you covered. I wanted to make sure my son’s (and later, my twins’) doctor was someone we all felt comfortable with, and someone my kids could preferably go back to for years to come.

I’ll share a few factors you might want to consider when whittling down your choices, and resources to start your search. Find the rest of the questions here…

We hope that you have selected the right pediatrician for your newborn. Do make sure that you look for a Pediatrician near me, so that commuting is not a pain. 

Drug screen result form, pills, stethoscope. Medicine, spoon, stethoscope, drug screen result form. Abuse of drugs harm for life.

Doctors Immediate Care offers drug screenings. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why drug test?

Drug screening tests play a crucial role in the job recruitment process. The screening includes urine, hair, blood, saliva and sweat testing.

Doctors Immediate Care has well-qualified doctors, lab assistants and nurses to determine healthy candidates for employers. We understand time is a factor, so tests are administered efficiently and results are provided quickly.

 

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