If you’ve had a non-life-threatening head injury, make an appointment at your local Doctor’s Immediate Care office. Our medical professionals can help.

What is a head injury?

A head injury is any sort of injury to your brain, skull, or scalp. This can range from a mild bump or bruise to a traumatic brain injury. Common head injuries include concussions, skull fractures, and scalp wounds. The consequences and treatments vary greatly, depending on what caused your head injury and how severe it is.

It can be hard to assess how serious a head injury is just by looking. Some minor head injuries bleed a lot, while some major injuries don’t bleed at all. It’s important to treat all head injuries seriously and get them assessed by a qualified doctor like the ones on staff at Doctor’s Immediate Care.

What happens when you bump your head?

Even if the skull is not fractured, the brain can hit the inside of the skull and be bruised. The head may look fine, but problems could result from bleeding or swelling inside the skull. The spinal cord is also likely to be injured in any serious trauma. Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury.

What are the symptoms of hitting your head too hard?

The following signs or symptoms after a head injury, which could signal a concussion:

– Persistent or worsening headache
– Imbalance
– Vomiting
– Memory loss or confusion
– Mood changes, such as irritability

Is a head injury serious?

A head injury is any sort of injury to your brain, skull, or scalp. This can range from a mild bump or bruise to a traumatic brain injury. Common head injuries include concussions, skull fractures, and scalp wounds. It can be hard to assess how serious a head injury is just by looking.

Can you go to sleep after hitting your head?

There is no benefit to keeping someone awake after a concussion, and it is no longer recommended. In fact, people with a concussion need to sleep to recover.

How long do head injury symptoms last?

The symptoms of a brain injury can be subtle or may not be noticed until you return to normal activities. Symptoms can last up to 4 weeks, can fluctuate in intensity, but overall should improve with time.