five-facts-you-should-know-about-arthritis

What To Understand About Arthritis and How To Deal With It

Arthritis affects the people of all ages. The common symptoms of arthritis include joint pain, swelling and stiffness that may vary over time. Arthritis makes life painful, causing trouble in physical activities and get worse with age leading to disabilities.

Regardless of age or sex arthritis can cripple anyone. Although, nearly 53 million adults and 300,000 children have fallen victim to arthritis in America, most people are little aware about this disease and the type of arthritis they suffer.

Osteoarthritis or degenerate arthritis:

It is one of the most common forms of arthritis affecting millions across the world. When the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears away, it rubs against one another and commonly causes pain in the joints of knees, hands, hips and spine. There is no any common cure for Osteoarthritis. You can control its effect only by:

  •  Maintaining a healthy weight
  •  Regular physical activity balancing rest
  •  Avoiding excessive and repetitive movements.
  •  Using other therapies and treatment.

Inflammatory arthritis:

When human immune systems mistakenly attack the joints and body tissues it is called rheumatoid or inflammatory arthritis. Besides attacking the joints it can affect other organs and parts of the body like eyes, skin, lungs and blood vessels. The symptoms get worse over time with the progress of the disease.

Infectious or septic Arthritis:

It is often caused by the infection of bacteria or viruses into your joints. Joints may become infected with germs or viruses travel through the bloodstream or directly through any injuries. Prompt treatment is necessary to clear the joint infection and prevent the spreading of infection.

Metabolic Arthritis:

The Human body produces uric acid and sometimes its amount increases more than the required. The extra amount of uric acid remains within the body because the body can’t discharge it quickly enough. It creates some needle like crystals in the joint, causing sudden episodic joint paint. It’s also called Gout attack. Controlling the uric acid level in your blood is the only way to get rid of Gout.

Is there any possible prevention?

Research is still underway to find a solution of Arthritis. Right now, it is a kind of disease where true prevention seems to be impossible. However, one can reduce the effect of arthritis and can slow down its progress by taking some caution.

  •  Maintain a healthy weight with regular physical activity.
  •  Eat healthy food, eat less, and do more aerobic exercise.
  •  Water exercises are best for arthritis sufferers.
  •  Quit smoking and drinking alcohol specially those who suffers Gout.
  •  Avoiding excessive and repetitive movements .
  •  Strengthening the muscles around the join for added support.
  •  Use some therapies and medication to help reduce pain and inflammation.
  •  Don’t delay to see a doctor if you have joint symptoms.

These are the things that can be done to preserve joint function and regain pleasure in life with no more pain. Arthritis is the no 1 reason causing disability among many people across the world. It might seem simple or its symptoms may not be severe for you during the initial period. But at any point of time it shouldn’t be ignored and it’s a good idea to visit your doctor as early as possible.

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If you believe you have a sexually transmitted disease, (STD) it’s important to be tested and get proper treatment right away. The board certified physicians at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment today.

The STD Lab Panel contains the following tests:

    • Chlamydia Test
    • Gonorrhea Test
    • HIV-1 Antibodies Test
    • Syphilis Test
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type I
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type II
    • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
    • Hepatitis B Core Antibodies Total
    • Hepatitis C Antibody

Insured Patients – Some or all of included services may be covered by your insurance plan. Please check with your insurance provider before scheduling an appointment. As a courtesy, we will file a claim on your behalf to insurance companies we are in-network with.

Gonorrhea and Chlamydia

These STDs often co-exist in the same infected individual and can be passed simultaneously to a sexual partner. Since treatment for each of these conditions may differ, it’s an excellent medical practice to test for both if either one is suspected. Furthermore, these serious STDs may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, if they are not treated, they can cause pain and serious health problems, such as arthritis and infertility.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a serious bacterial infection. It’s usually passed from one person to another by sexual contact. If it’s not treated, syphilis can lead to permanent brain, nerve, and tissue damage.

Herpes (HSV)

Genital herpes is a common STD caused by a virus. The virus is called the herpes simplex virus or HSV. It causes painful blisters that break open and form sores in the genital area.

HIV-1 Infection and AIDS

HIV is the abbreviation used for the human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a life-threatening disease.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed and tender. It may also become swollen. Areas of liver tissue may be destroyed by the inflammation. Hepatitis B is a serious, sometimes severe and even fatal type of hepatitis. In addition to being a sexually transmitted disease (STD), Hepatitis B is a blood-borne pathogen and exposure to the blood of an infected person may result in infection.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed. Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. The virus is spread mainly through contact with infected blood. Sometimes it’s spread through sexual contact.

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Doctors Immediate Care offers low cost vaccinations. Please call your local office to make an appointment.

What vaccinations does Doctors Immediate Care provide?

Doctors Immediate Care can provide Hep B, HIB, DTaP, IPV, Prevnar, Rotatek, CBC and lead level, MMR, Varicella, Meningococcal , HPV #1, HPV #2, HPV #3, Gardasil, Zoster( Shingles).

Vaccines play an important role in keeping us healthy. They protect us from serious and sometimes deadly diseases. Please call our offices to schedule an appointment.

Read answers to common questions to learn more about vaccine safety, the recommended schedule, how vaccines protect your child from 14 diseases by age two, and more.

Q: Are vaccines safe?

A: Yes. Vaccines are very safe. The United States’ long-standing vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. Currently, the United States has the safest vaccine supply in its history. Millions of children safely receive vaccines each year. The most common side effects are typically very mild, such as pain or swelling at the injection site.

Q: What are the side effects of the vaccines? How do I treat them?

A: Vaccines, like any medication, may cause some side effects. Most of these side effects are very minor, like soreness where the shot was given, fussiness, or a low-grade fever. These side effects typically only last a couple of days and are treatable. For example, you can apply a cool, wet washcloth on the sore area to ease discomfort.

Serious reactions are very rare. However, if your child experiences any reactions that concern you, call the doctor’s office.

Q: What are the risks and benefits of vaccines?

A: Vaccines can prevent infectious diseases that once killed or harmed many infants, children, and adults. Without vaccines, your child is at risk for getting seriously ill and suffering pain, disability, and even death from diseases like measles and whooping cough. The main risks associated with getting vaccines are side effects, which are almost always mild (redness and swelling at the injection site) and go away within a few days. Serious side effects after vaccination, such as a severe allergic reaction, are very rare and doctors and clinic staff are trained to deal with them. The disease-prevention benefits of getting vaccines are much greater than the possible side effects for almost all children. The only exceptions to this are cases in which a child has a serious chronic medical condition like cancer or a disease that weakens the immune system, or has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous vaccine dose.

Q: Is there a link between vaccines and autism?

A: No. Scientific studies and reviews continue to show no relationship between vaccines and autism.

Some people have suggested that thimerosal (a compound that contains mercury) in vaccines given to infants and young children might be a cause of autism. Others have suggested that the MMR (measles- mumps-rubella) vaccine may be linked to autism. However, numerous scientists and researchers have studied and continue to study the MMR vaccine and thimerosal, and reach the same conclusion: there is no link between MMR vaccine or thimerosal and autism.

Q: Why do vaccines start so early?

A: The recommended schedule protects infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they come into contact with life-threatening diseases. Children receive immunization early because they are susceptible to diseases at a young age. The consequences of these diseases can be very serious, even life-threatening, for infants and young children.

Q: Haven’t we gotten rid of most of these diseases in this country?

A: Some vaccine-preventable diseases, like pertussis (whooping cough) and chickenpox, remain common in the United States. On the other hand, other diseases vaccines prevent are no longer common in this country because of vaccines. However, if we stopped vaccinating, the few cases we have in the United States could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases. Even though many serious vaccine-preventable diseases are uncommon in the United States, some are common in other parts of the world. Even if your family does not travel internationally, you could come into contact with international travelers anywhere in your community. Children who don’t receive all vaccinations and are exposed to a disease can become seriously sick and spread it through a community.

Q: Why does my child need a chickenpox shot? Isn’t it a mild disease?

A: Your child needs a chickenpox vaccine because chickenpox can actually be a serious disease. In many cases, children experience a mild case of chickenpox, but other children may have blisters that become infected. Others may develop pneumonia. There is no way to tell in advance how severe your child’s symptoms will be.

Before vaccine was available, about 50 children died every year from chickenpox, and about 1 in 500 children who got chickenpox was hospitalized.

Q: My child is sick right now. Is it okay for her to still get shots?

A: Talk with your child’s doctor, but children can usually get vaccinated even if they have a mild illness like a cold, earache, mild fever, or diarrhea. If the doctor says it is okay, your child can still get vaccinated.

Q: What are the ingredients in vaccines and what do they do?

A: Vaccines contain ingredients that cause the body to develop immunity. Vaccines also contain very small amounts of other ingredients. All ingredients play necessary roles either in making the vaccine, or in ensuring that the final product is safe and effective.

Q: Don’t infants have natural immunity? Isn’t natural immunity better than the kind from vaccines?

A: Babies may get some temporary immunity (protection) from mom during the last few weeks of pregnancy, but only for diseases to which mom is immune. Breastfeeding may also protect your baby temporarily from minor infections, like colds. These antibodies do not last long, leaving your baby vulnerable to disease.

Natural immunity occurs when your child is exposed to a disease and becomes infected. It is true that natural immunity usually results in better immunity than vaccination, but the risks are much greater. A natural chickenpox infection may result in pneumonia, whereas the vaccine might only cause a sore arm for a couple of days.

Q: Can’t I just wait to vaccinate my baby, since he isn’t in child care, where he could be exposed to diseases?

A: No, even young children who are cared for at home can be exposed to vaccine preventable diseases, so it’s important for them to get all their vaccines at the recommended ages. Children can catch these illnesses from any number of people or places, including from parents, brothers or sisters, visitors to their home, on playgrounds or even at the grocery store. Regardless of whether or not your baby is cared for outside the home, she comes in contact with people throughout the day, some of whom may be sick but not know it yet.

If someone has a vaccine preventable disease, they may not have symptoms or the symptoms may be mild, and they can end up spreading disease to babies or young children.  Remember, many of these diseases can be especially dangerous to young children so it is safest to vaccinate your child at the recommended ages to protect her, whether or not she is in child care.

Q: Do I have to vaccinate my baby on schedule if I’m breastfeeding him?

A: Yes, even breastfed babies need to be protected with vaccines at the recommended ages. The immune system is not fully developed at birth, which puts newborns at greater risk for infections.

Breast milk provides important protection from some infections as your baby’s immune system is developing. For example, babies who are breastfed have a lower risk of ear infections, respiratory tract infections, and diarrhea. However, breast milk does not protect children against all diseases. Even in breastfed infants, vaccines are the most effective way to prevent many diseases. Your baby needs the long-term protection that can only come from making sure he receives all his vaccines according to the CDC’s recommended schedule.

Q: What’s wrong with delaying some of my baby’s vaccines if I’m planning to get them all eventually?

A: Young children have the highest risk of having a serious case of disease that could cause hospitalization or death. Delaying or spreading out vaccine doses leaves your child unprotected during the time when they need vaccine protection the most. For example, diseases such as Hib or pneumococcus almost always occur in the first 2 years of a baby’s life. And some diseases, like Hepatitis B and whooping cough (pertussis), are more serious when babies get them at a younger age. Vaccinating your child according to the CDC’s recommended immunization schedule means you can help protect him at a young age.

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