Has a cold got you down? The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

How does a cold start?
It usually begins with a sore throat or sneezing, and before you know it, you’ve also got these symptoms:

Runny nose (clear and watery)
Sneezing
Fatigue
Cough

You usually don’t get a fever with a cold. If you do, it may be a sign you’ve got the flu or an infection with a bacteria.

What is the first sign of a cold?

The first sign of a cold is usually a sore or irritated throat and is typically followed by early symptoms such as a headache, chilliness or lethargy. These develop quickly and can last one to two days. During the first few days, your nose may also start to run.

How long does a cold last for?

Cold symptoms usually start 2 or 3 days after a person has been exposed to the virus. People with colds are most contagious for the first 3 or 4 days after the symptoms begin and can be contagious for up to 3 weeks. Although some colds can linger for as long as 2 weeks, most clear up within a week.

How do I know if I have the flu or a cold?

The symptoms of flu can include fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches and fatigue. Cold symptoms are usually milder than the symptoms of flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose.

How does a cold start?

This can happen by direct physical contact with someone who has a cold, or by touching a surface contaminated with their germs and then touching your nose or mouth. You can also catch it from infected droplets in the air released by a sneeze or a cough.

How do you know you re getting a cold?

Signs and symptoms, which can vary from person to person, might include:

1. Runny or stuffy nose
2. Sore throat
3. Cough
4. Congestion
5. Slight body aches or a mild headache
6. Sneezing
7. Low-grade fever
8. Generally feeling unwell (malaise)


Found yourself with a fever? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call the office in your location to make an appointment.

What is a fever?

A fever is a temporary increase in your body temperature, often due to an illness. Having a fever is a sign that something out of the ordinary is going on in your body.

For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but usually isn’t a cause for concern unless it reaches 103 F (39.4 C) or higher. For infants and toddlers, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.

Fevers generally go away within a few days. A number of over-the-counter medications lower a fever, but sometimes it’s better left untreated. Fever seems to play a key role in helping your body fight off a number of infections.

What causes fever?

In response to an infection, illness, or some other cause, the hypothalamus may reset the body to a higher temperature. Although the most common causes of fever are common infections such as colds and gastroenteritis, other causes include: Infections of the ear, lung, skin, throat, bladder, or kidney.

What are the symptoms of fever?

Depending on what’s causing your fever, additional fever signs and symptoms may include:

– Sweating.
– Chills and shivering.
– Headache.
– Muscle aches.
– Loss of appetite.
– Irritability.
– Dehydration.
– General weakness.

Is a fever contagious?

No matter the illness, keep your child home if she has a fever. It may seem harmless enough, but assume any fever is a symptom of a contagious condition. Viruses that cause fevers are contagious as long as the fever is above a 100.4 degrees F.

How long do fevers last?

The type of infection causing the fever usually determines how often the fever recurs and how long the fever lasts. Fevers due to viruses can last for as little as two to three days and sometime as long as two weeks. A fever caused by a bacterial infection may continue until the child is treated with an antibiotic.

How long are you contagious with a fever?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recommends staying home for 24 hours after a fever and other flu-like symptoms (chills, sweating, flushed skin) have cleared up.

When should you worry about a fever?

1. If the temperature is 103 F (39.4 C) or greater (fever is too high)
2. If the fever lasts more than seven days.
3. If the fever symptoms get worse (concern if fever is increasing toward 39.4 C)


Doctors Immediate Care
18W511 Roosevelt Rd
Lombard, IL 60148
(630) 448-6724

Open Daily: Mon – Fri 9am – 7:30pm  Saturday: 9am – 4pm  Closed Sunday

Urine drug testing is one action an employer can take to determine if employees or job applicants are using drugs.  It can identify evidence of recent use of alcohol, prescription drugs and illicit drugs. The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can administer these tests for you. Please call our offices to make an appointment.

Why Urine drug test?

There are a number of different bodily specimens that can be chemically tested to detect evidence of recent drug use. Although some state laws dictate which types of tests can be used, a number of options are technologically feasible. Urine is the most commonly used specimen when testing for illicit drugs.

The results of a urine test show the presence or absence of drug metabolites in a person’s urine. Metabolites are drug residues that remain in the body for some time after the effects of a drug have worn off. It’s important to note that a positive urine test does not necessarily mean a person was under the influence of drugs at the time of the test. Rather, it detects and measures use of a particular drug within the previous few days and has become the defacto evidence of current use.

Because alcohol passes rapidly through the system, urine tests must be conducted very quickly after alcohol consumption to ensure any degree of accuracy. For this reason, urine tests are generally not helpful in detecting alcohol use as opposed to illicit and prescription drug use, which is more easily traced in urine.

Got a scratchy, sore throat? Not able to swallow? The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is a sore throat?

A sore throat is pain, scratchiness or irritation of the throat that often worsens when you swallow. The most common cause of a sore throat (pharyngitis) is a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. A sore throat caused by a virus resolves on its own.

Strep throat (streptococcal infection), a less common type of sore throat caused by bacteria, requires treatment with antibiotics to prevent complications. Other less common causes of sore throat might require more complex treatment.

What are the symptoms of a sore throat?

Symptoms of a sore throat can vary depending on the cause. Signs and symptoms might include:

Pain or a scratchy sensation in the throat
Pain that worsens with swallowing or talking
Difficulty swallowing
Sore, swollen glands in your neck or jaw
Swollen, red tonsils
White patches or pus on your tonsils
Hoarse or muffled voice

How is a sore throat caused?

Sore throats can be caused by viruses or bacteria. Viral sore throats are often accompanied by other cold symptoms that may include a runny nose, cough, red or watery eyes, and sneezing. Other causes of sore throat include smoking, pollution or irritants in the air, allergies, and dry air.

How long does it take a sore throat to heal?

Viral pharyngitis often goes away in five to seven days. If you have bacterial pharyngitis, you will feel better after you have taken antibiotics for two to three days. You must take your antibiotic even when you are feeling better. If you don’t take all of it, your sore throat could come back.

Why does it hurt to swallow?

Sore throats caused by a bacterial infection—like strep throat or tonsillitis—can be severe. What you will have is a sore throat that starts quickly and can cause a whole lot of pain while swallowing. You may also have bad breath, fever, and swollen lymph nodes in your neck.

Is sore throat contagious?

Yes, pharyngitis (viral and bacterial) is contagious and can be transmitted from one person to another. Usually, mucus, nasal discharge and saliva can contain the viruses and/or bacteria that can cause sore throat . Consequently, even kissing can cause transfer of these organisms.

What is the first sign of strep throat?

Signs and symptoms of strep throat can include: Throat pain that usually comes on quickly. Painful swallowing. Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus.

When should you go to the doctor for a sore throat?

In most cases, your sore throat will improve with at-home treatment. However, it’s time to see your doctor if a severe sore throat and a fever over 101 degrees lasts longer than one to two days; you have difficulty sleeping because your throat is blocked by swollen tonsils or adenoids; or a red rash appears.


Sexually Transmitted Diseases Medicine doctor hand working Professional doctor use computer and medical equipment all around, desktop top view

If you believe you have a sexually transmitted disease, (STD) it’s important to be tested and get proper treatment right away. The board certified physicians at Doctors Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment today.

The STD Lab Panel contains the following tests:

    • Chlamydia Test
    • Gonorrhea Test
    • HIV-1 Antibodies Test
    • Syphilis Test
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type I
    • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type II
    • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
    • Hepatitis B Core Antibodies Total
    • Hepatitis C Antibody

Insured Patients – Some or all of included services may be covered by your insurance plan. Please check with your insurance provider before scheduling an appointment. As a courtesy, we will file a claim on your behalf to insurance companies we are in-network with.

Gonorrhea and Chlamydia

These STDs often co-exist in the same infected individual and can be passed simultaneously to a sexual partner. Since treatment for each of these conditions may differ, it’s an excellent medical practice to test for both if either one is suspected. Furthermore, these serious STDs may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, if they are not treated, they can cause pain and serious health problems, such as arthritis and infertility.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a serious bacterial infection. It’s usually passed from one person to another by sexual contact. If it’s not treated, syphilis can lead to permanent brain, nerve, and tissue damage.

Herpes (HSV)

Genital herpes is a common STD caused by a virus. The virus is called the herpes simplex virus or HSV. It causes painful blisters that break open and form sores in the genital area.

HIV-1 Infection and AIDS

HIV is the abbreviation used for the human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a life-threatening disease.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed and tender. It may also become swollen. Areas of liver tissue may be destroyed by the inflammation. Hepatitis B is a serious, sometimes severe and even fatal type of hepatitis. In addition to being a sexually transmitted disease (STD), Hepatitis B is a blood-borne pathogen and exposure to the blood of an infected person may result in infection.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver. The liver becomes inflamed. Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. The virus is spread mainly through contact with infected blood. Sometimes it’s spread through sexual contact.

If you think you may have asthma, or if you do have it, the medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow, swell and produce extra mucus. This can make breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.

For some people, asthma is a minor nuisance. For others, it can be a major problem that interferes with daily activities and may lead to a life-threatening asthma attack.

Asthma can’t be cured, but its symptoms can be controlled. Because asthma often changes over time, it’s important that you work with the medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care to track your signs and symptoms and adjust treatment as needed.

What are the early symptoms of asthma?

– Frequent cough, especially at night
– Losing your breath easily or shortness of breath
– Feeling very tired or weak when exercising
– Wheezing or coughing after exercise
– Feeling tired, easily upset, grouchy, or moody
– Decreases or changes in lung function as measured on a peak flow meter
– Signs of a cold or allergies (sneezing, runny nose, cough, nasal congestion, sore throat, and headache)
– Trouble sleeping

Can asthma kill you?

Asthma is Serious. Asthma is a serious disease, and can kill if it is not treated the right way. One large study showed that in the children who died of asthma, one third of them had mild disease! When it is treated the right way, people with asthma can live normal, active lives.

Can asthma go away on its own?

The wheezing is treated just like asthma, but it goes away by itself, usually by age 5 or 6. Most kids who have symptoms like wheezing and shortness of breath beyond that age are considered to have asthma, and they may always have it. But for about half of them, symptoms go away around adolescence.

How long do asthma attacks last?

The duration of an attack can vary, depending on what caused it and how long the airways have been inflamed. Mild episodes may last only a few minutes; more severe ones can last from hours to days. Mild attacks can resolve spontaneously or may require medication, typically a quick-acting inhaler.

What is the main cause of asthma?

Asthma triggers. Exposure to various irritants and substances that trigger allergies (allergens) can trigger signs and symptoms of asthma. Asthma triggers are different from person to person and can include: Airborne substances, such as pollen, dust mites, mold spores, pet dander or particles of cockroach waste.

What are the symptoms of severe asthma?

A severe asthma attack can cause symptoms such as:

– Shortness of breath
– Can’t speak in full sentences
– Feel breathless even when you lie down
– Chest feels tight
– Bluish tint to your lips
– Feel agitated, confused, or can’t concentrate
– Hunched shoulders, strained abdominal and neck muscles
– Feel that you need to sit or stand up to breathe more easily


 

Sample blood collection tube with HIV test label on HIV infection screening test form.

The medical professionals at Doctors Immediate Care are equipped to do HIV testing. Testing is always kept strictly confidential. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why Test for HIV?

HIV testing shows whether a person has HIV. HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus.

HIV is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV infection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone 13 to 64 years old get tested for HIV at least once and that people at high risk of infection get tested more often.

What are the risk factors for HIV?

Risk factors for HIV infection include having unprotected sex (sex without a condom) with someone who is HIV positive or whose HIV status you don’t know, having sex with many partners, and injecting drugs and sharing needles, syringes, or other drug equipment with others.

The CDC recommends that all pregnant women get tested for HIV as early as possible during each pregnancy.

Drug screen result form, pills, stethoscope. Medicine, spoon, stethoscope, drug screen result form. Abuse of drugs harm for life.

Doctors Immediate Care offers drug screenings. Call your local office to make an appointment.

Why drug test?

Drug screening tests play a crucial role in the job recruitment process. The screening includes urine, hair, blood, saliva and sweat testing.

Doctors Immediate Care has well-qualified doctors, lab assistants and nurses to determine healthy candidates for employers. We understand time is a factor, so tests are administered efficiently and results are provided quickly.

 

Doctors Immediate Care
3452 W Devon Ave
Lincolnwood, IL 60712
(847) 393-4278

Open Daily: Mon – Fri 10am – 8pm  Closed Sat & Sun

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