How to Select a Pediatrician

If it’s been 28 weeks into pregnancy, now is the time for you to find a pediatrician who can help you with taking care of your baby. Having a doctor whom you trust is important since you might need the assistance from time to time for your newborn. In the article below, we look at how to find the right Pediatrician.

The best time to start looking for a pediatrician is between 28 and 34 weeks into your pregnancy when you likely know what you want and have at least a few weeks to do your homework. The process may seem daunting, but realize you’re not trying to find the Best Pediatrician in the World — you’re looking for the best one for your child and one who has personal connection with you.

Research Doctors

One person’s pick is sometimes another’s pan, which is why you should collect at least three if not half a dozen names from friends and coworkers. (If you’re short on names, try the American Academy of Pediatrics’ referral site at aap.org/referral.) Call your insurance company about any doctor you’re interested in but don’t see on the list — provider lists change frequently, and the pediatrician may have been added recently.

Next, scout out the location of the pediatrician’s office. Given how often you’ll be schlepping there, you’ll want a short commute. The day that my then 8-month-old daughter suddenly developed a weird body rash, I loved that I was able to call, drive to the office, and be in an exam room within 20 minutes. Also look into which hospitals your candidates are affiliated with; you’ll want one that’s both convenient and reputable. Know more…

Once you decide which pediatrician to have, the next step is to look at the questions that you should ask.

Expecting a New Baby? Top Questions to Ask Potential Pediatricians

It comes down to visiting and interviewing potential pediatricians for a meet and greet. But if you’re a first-time mom or perhaps find yourself starting a new search, you might not know the right questions to ask or where to even begin.

Don’t worry—I’ve got you covered. I wanted to make sure my son’s (and later, my twins’) doctor was someone we all felt comfortable with, and someone my kids could preferably go back to for years to come.

I’ll share a few factors you might want to consider when whittling down your choices, and resources to start your search. Find the rest of the questions here…

We hope that you have selected the right pediatrician for your newborn. Do make sure that you look for a Pediatrician near me, so that commuting is not a pain. 

Drug testing is one action an employer can take to determine if employees or job applicants are using drugs. It can identify evidence of recent use of alcohol, prescription drugs and illicit drugs. The professional medical team at Doctors Immediate Care can preform these tests for you. Call our office to make an appointment.

Currently, drug testing does not test for impairment or whether a person’s behavior is, or was, impacted by drugs. Drug testing works best when implemented based on a clear, written policy that is shared with all employees, along with employee education about the dangers of alcohol and drug abuse, supervisor training on the signs and symptoms of alcohol and drug abuse, and an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to provide help for employees who may have an alcohol or drug problem.

Why do employers drug test?

Alcohol and drug abuse creates significant safety and health hazards and can result in decreased productivity and poor employee morale.  It also can lead to additional costs in the form of health care claims, especially short-term disability claims.

Employers implement drug testing to:

  • Deter employees from abusing alcohol and drugs
  • Prevent hiring individuals who use illegal drugs
  • Be able to identify early and appropriately refer employees who have drug and/or alcohol problems
  • Provide a safe workplace for employees
  • Protect the general public and instill consumer confidence that employees are working safely
  • Comply with State laws or Federal regulations
  • Benefit from Workers’ Compensation Premium Discount programs

How is drug testing conducted and how accurate is it?

Generally, most private employers have a fair amount of latitude in implementing drug testing for their organization, unless they are subject to certain Federal regulations, such as the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) drug-testing rules for employees in safety-sensitive positions.  However, Federal agencies conducting drug testing must follow standardized procedures established by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

While private employers are not required to follow these guidelines, doing so can help them stay on safe legal ground.  Court decisions have supported following these guidelines, and as a result, many employers choose to follow them.  These Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing (also called SAMHSA’s guidelines) include having a Medical Review Officer (MRO) evaluate tests.  They also identify the five substances tested for in Federal drug-testing programs and require the use of drug labs certified by SAMHSA.

The most common method of drug testing, urinalysis, can be done at the workplace (at a health unit, for example), a doctor’s office or any other site selected by the employer.  An employee or applicant provides a sample to be tested.  Usually precautions are taken, such as putting blue dye in the toilet and turning off the water supply, to prevent adulteration or substitution of specimens so that collection can be completed in privacy without any direct visual observation by another person.

Under SAMHSA’s guidelines, once a sample is provided, it is sent to a certified laboratory.  The accuracy of drug tests done by certified laboratories is very high, but this certification applies only to the five substances tested for in Federal drug-testing programs and alcohol.

Got body aches? The medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call the office in your location to make an appointment.

Body aches, pains, soreness, and tenderness can affect one, two, or many parts of the body. It also may feel like your entire body is painful or tender to the touch.

Body aches and pains can persistently affect one area only, can shift and affect another area or areas, and can migrate all over and affect many areas over and over again.


Why is my whole body aching?

Hyperstimulation can cause the body’s muscles to remain tight even though the immediate threat has passed. Headaches, muscle pain, muscle tension, tight muscles, body aches and pains, and stiffness are all common symptoms of stress-response hyperstimulation. This can also be a cause of persistent body aches and pains.

Why does my body ache and I feel tired all the time?

Chronic fatigue syndrome. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition that causes you to feel exhausted and weak, no matter how much rest or sleep you get. It often causes insomnia. Because your body doesn’t feel rested or replenished, CFS can also cause aches in the muscles and joints throughout your body.

What can cause unexplained muscle pain?

The most common causes of muscle pain are tension, stress, overuse and minor injuries. Systemic muscle pain or pain throughout your whole body is more often the result of an infection, an illness or a side effect of a medication. Common causes of muscle pain include: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome.


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