If you find yourself feeling nauseous, the medical professionals at Doctor’s Immediate Care can help. Call your local office to make an appointment.

What is nausea?

Nausea is an unpleasant sensation of discomfort or unease in the stomach (queasy stomach), accompanied by an urge to vomit. Nausea often precedes vomiting.

What does it mean when you feel nausea?

Nausea is a common symptom that may accompany many diseases and conditions. Common causes of nausea include drug side effects, food poisoning, motion sickness, pregnancy, and drinking too much alcohol. Nausea is often accompanied by symptoms of gastrointestinal distress such as diarrhea.

How do I stop feeling nauseous?

If you are already feeling nauseated, these tips may help you avoid vomiting:

1. Sit down or lie in a propped-up position. Physical activity will make you feel worse.
2. Drink a small amount of a sweet beverage such as ginger ale or Gatorade. …
3. Have a popsicle or a similar sweetened ice treat.

Can stress and anxiety cause nausea?

Since acute or chronic stress, fear, and anxiety can cause the body to function abnormally, they can cause a number of stomach and intestinal distresses including nausea, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, “lump in the stomach,” constipation, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and general stomach malaise, to name a few.

Why do I feel nauseous and dizzy?

Causes of dizziness. Common causes of dizziness include a migraine, medications, and alcohol. It can also be caused by a problem in the inner ear, where balance is regulated. The most common cause of vertigo and vertigo-related dizziness is benign positional vertigo (BPV).

What are the main causes of nausea?

Common causes of nausea are described below:

– Heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
– Infection or virus
– Medications
– Motion sickness and seasickness
– Diet
– Pain
– Ulcer


How to Select a Pediatrician

If it’s been 28 weeks into pregnancy, now is the time for you to find a pediatrician who can help you with taking care of your baby. Having a doctor whom you trust is important since you might need the assistance from time to time for your newborn. In the article below, we look at how to find the right Pediatrician.

The best time to start looking for a pediatrician is between 28 and 34 weeks into your pregnancy when you likely know what you want and have at least a few weeks to do your homework. The process may seem daunting, but realize you’re not trying to find the Best Pediatrician in the World — you’re looking for the best one for your child and one who has personal connection with you.

Research Doctors

One person’s pick is sometimes another’s pan, which is why you should collect at least three if not half a dozen names from friends and coworkers. (If you’re short on names, try the American Academy of Pediatrics’ referral site at aap.org/referral.) Call your insurance company about any doctor you’re interested in but don’t see on the list — provider lists change frequently, and the pediatrician may have been added recently.

Next, scout out the location of the pediatrician’s office. Given how often you’ll be schlepping there, you’ll want a short commute. The day that my then 8-month-old daughter suddenly developed a weird body rash, I loved that I was able to call, drive to the office, and be in an exam room within 20 minutes. Also look into which hospitals your candidates are affiliated with; you’ll want one that’s both convenient and reputable. Know more…

Once you decide which pediatrician to have, the next step is to look at the questions that you should ask.

Expecting a New Baby? Top Questions to Ask Potential Pediatricians

It comes down to visiting and interviewing potential pediatricians for a meet and greet. But if you’re a first-time mom or perhaps find yourself starting a new search, you might not know the right questions to ask or where to even begin.

Don’t worry—I’ve got you covered. I wanted to make sure my son’s (and later, my twins’) doctor was someone we all felt comfortable with, and someone my kids could preferably go back to for years to come.

I’ll share a few factors you might want to consider when whittling down your choices, and resources to start your search. Find the rest of the questions here…

We hope that you have selected the right pediatrician for your newborn. Do make sure that you look for a Pediatrician near me, so that commuting is not a pain. 

Medical doctor drawing allergy on the virtual screen.

What is a food allergy?

When you have a food allergy, your body thinks certain foods are trying to harm you. Your body fights back by setting off an allergic reaction. In most cases, the symptoms are mild—a rash, a stuffy nose, or an upset stomach. A serious reaction can be deadly.

Allergies tend to run in families. You’re more likely to have a food allergy if other people in your family have allergies like hay fever, asthma, or eczema (atopic dermatitis).

Food allergies are more common in children than adults. About 7 out of 100 kids have them but only about 2 out of 100 adults do. Children often outgrow their food allergies, but if you have a food allergy as an adult, you will most likely have it for life.

What are the symptoms?

Food allergies can cause many different symptoms. They can range from mild to serious. Your mouth may tingle, and your lips may swell. Other symptoms include:

•Cramps, an upset stomach, or diarrhea
•Itchy skin with red, raised bumps called hives
•Stuffy nose, wheezing, or shortness of breath
•Dizziness or lightheaded

Kids usually have the same symptoms as adults, but sometimes a small child will cry persistently, vomit, have diarrhea, or not grow as expected. If your child has any of these symptoms, see your doctor.

Some people have symptoms after eating even a tiny bit of food. As a rule, the sooner the reaction begins, the worse it will be:

•Your throat and tongue may swell quickly
•You may suddenly start wheezing or have trouble breathing
•You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit
•You may feel faint or pass out

Note: If you have (or see someone having) any of these symptoms, call 911 right away.

What foods most often cause a food allergy?

A few foods cause most allergies. A food that causes an allergy is called a food allergen. Usually it is the protein in a food that causes the problem.

•Eggs, milk, peanuts, wheat, soy, and fish cause most problems in children. Most kids outgrow allergies to milk, wheat, eggs, and soy by the time they are 5. But kids rarely outgrow an allergy to peanuts or fish.
•Peanuts, tree nuts (like walnuts or almonds), fish, and shellfish cause most problems in adults.
•If you are allergic to one food, you may also be allergic to other foods like it. So if you are allergic to peanuts, you may also be allergic to soybeans or peas.

How is a food allergy diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask questions about your medical history and do a physical exam. Your doctor will also ask what symptoms you have.

If your doctor thinks you could have a serious food allergy, you may have a skin test. The doctor will put a little bit of liquid on your skin and then prick your skin. The liquid has some of the possible food allergen in it. If your skin swells up like a mosquito bite, your doctor knows you are allergic to that food. Your doctor may also do blood tests to look for the chemicals in your blood that cause an allergic reaction.

How is a food allergy treated?

The best treatment is to never eat the foods you are allergic to. Learn to read food labels and spot other names for problem foods. For example, milk may be listed as “caseinate,” wheat as “gluten,” and peanuts as “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.” When you eat out or at other people’s houses, ask about the foods you are served

If you do eat a food you are allergic to, medicines can help. You may be able to stop a mild reaction by taking over-the-counter antihistamines. You may need prescription medicines if over-the-counter drugs don’t help or if they cause side effects, such as making you feel sleepy.

Next Steps

Poor health can significantly affect your life. Improve your life by creating good health habits. Call your local office to schedule an appointment with one of our doctors for evaluation and testing.

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